united states – Balibs http://balibs.org/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 18:28:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://balibs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png united states – Balibs http://balibs.org/ 32 32 North Korean authorities arrest dance teacher and students after she teaches ‘capitalist’ dance steps https://balibs.org/north-korean-authorities-arrest-dance-teacher-and-students-after-she-teaches-capitalist-dance-steps/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/north-korean-authorities-arrest-dance-teacher-and-students-after-she-teaches-capitalist-dance-steps/ North Korean authorities arrest a dance teacher and her students after she taught them ‘capitalist’ dance steps A dance teacher was arrested for teaching ‘capitalist’ dance moves to teenagers The teacher used the private dance studio to supplement her salary She was in breach of a 2020 law to limit the use of foreign media […]]]>

North Korean authorities arrest a dance teacher and her students after she taught them ‘capitalist’ dance steps

  • A dance teacher was arrested for teaching ‘capitalist’ dance moves to teenagers
  • The teacher used the private dance studio to supplement her salary
  • She was in breach of a 2020 law to limit the use of foreign media

North Korean authorities have reportedly arrested a dance teacher and several students for using foreign media to teach “capitalist” dance steps.

The dance teacher from the city of Pyongsong in the northwest of the country used a USB stick containing foreign songs and dance videos to teach teenagers.

The USB drive was seized and the teacher arrested.

The secretive Asian country passed the Elimination of Reactionary Thought and Culture Act in late 2020 to crack down on the distribution and surveillance of foreign media – especially from capitalist countries like the United States and South Korea.

Moving from capitalist countries like South Korea is prohibited for North Koreans

The law provides for the death penalty for the most serious offences.

The draconian legislation has been used to punish drivers for tinting their car windows and using South Korean-style speech and slang.

A resident of North Korea told RFA’s Korea Service: “The anti-socialist inspection group caught a female dance teacher in her 30s who was teaching foreign-style disco dances to teenage students in Yangji-dong in the city. from Pyongsong.

“The Anti-Socialism Inspection Group, a joint operation of the State Security Department and the police, has cracked down hard on people who watch South Korean films and distribute foreign media.

The source claimed that although there is generally more lax enforcement around Seollal, a Lunar New Year holiday, this year has seen a heavy crackdown.

The law was passed by North Korea's ruling Communist Party to limit the influence of foreign culture

The law was passed by North Korea’s ruling Communist Party to limit the influence of foreign culture

RFA sources said the woman graduated in choreography from Pyongsong University of the Arts and was assigned to teach at Okchon High School in Pyongsong.

She reportedly ran the private dance academy to supplement her salary of 3,000 won ($0.60) for her assigned work and charged $10 for a one-hour session.

A second source said, “They preferred to learn how to dance like they do in South Korea, China and America, rather than North Korean style. So she taught them how.

Another Pyongsong resident told RFA: “A provincial party official’s granddaughter was caught with an SD card installed on her smartphone and it contained South Korean movies.” During the investigation, she disclosed how and where she purchased the SD card,’ the third source said on condition of anonymity.

“The wealthy class usually buy USB sticks smuggled by sea from China. In the end, those who illegally sell or lend these USB keys and SD cards to teenagers are caught one after the other, including a relative of a public prosecutor.

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South Pacific from Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sadler’s Wells https://balibs.org/south-pacific-from-rodgers-hammerstein-sadlers-wells/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 17:22:51 +0000 https://balibs.org/south-pacific-from-rodgers-hammerstein-sadlers-wells/ South Pacific from Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sadler’s Wells South Pacific from Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sadler’s Wells Holly CW The critically acclaimed Chichester Festival Theater production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s 1949 musical South Pacific docks at Sadler’s Wells this summer. Directed by the theater’s artistic director Daniel Evans (Me and my daughter, fiddler on the roof), […]]]>

South Pacific from Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sadler’s Wells
South Pacific from Rodgers & Hammerstein, Sadler’s Wells

Holly CW

The critically acclaimed Chichester Festival Theater production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s 1949 musical South Pacific docks at Sadler’s Wells this summer. Directed by the theater’s artistic director Daniel Evans (Me and my daughter, fiddler on the roof), the production was praised for emphasizing the Broadway hit’s anti-racist message, which concerns American and French colonization of the Pacific Islands.

Adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by James A. Michener Tales from the South Pacific, the plot centers on the blossoming relationship between an American nurse, Nellie, who is stationed on an island in the South Pacific during World War II, and a middle-aged French plantation owner, Emile de Becque. Nellie loves Emile, but finds it difficult to accept her mixed-race children. Also on the island and just as conflicted is a United States Navy lieutenant, who has fallen in love with a young Tonkinese woman, but fears the social consequences of her marriage.

Underpinning it all are some of the musical duo’s most beloved songs, including “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair”, “Bali Ha’i”, and “You’ve Got to Be Carefully Taught”. – the latter, no doubt, ahead of its time in exploring racial prejudice on stage.

Julian Ovenden (Bridgerton, Downton Abbey) and Gina Beck (Matilda, Bad and Wretched). The design is in the hands of Peter McKintosh (Olivier-winning Crazy of you), while the choreography is in charge of Ann Yee (Caroline, or change).

It’s been a real year for Rodgers & Hammerstein covers. Last summer, Timothy Sheader and Drew McOnie refreshed the couple’s 1945 musical Carousel at the Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre, and spring sees director Daniel Fish’s dark, Tony-winning revival of 1943 Oklahoma! make his mark at the Young Vic.

So, from the windswept plains of a southern US state to the tropical islands of the Pacific, we’re heading for another dive into the duo’s vast musical canon.

South Pacific is on view at Sadler’s Wells from 27 July to 28 August. Click here to book.

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Raveena’s new song ‘Rush’ is an ode to dance and acid Bollywood – https://balibs.org/raveenas-new-song-rush-is-an-ode-to-dance-and-acid-bollywood/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/raveenas-new-song-rush-is-an-ode-to-dance-and-acid-bollywood/ While Ravena is known for her wispy R&B stretched with her airy vocals, her new track “Rush” is an upbeat, danceable feast of color that blends multiple worlds together: Technicolor’s ode to Bollywood, which tells the story of a traveling Punjabi princess through space, was inspired by Indian percussion and an acid journey that Raveena […]]]>

While Ravena is known for her wispy R&B stretched with her airy vocals, her new track “Rush” is an upbeat, danceable feast of color that blends multiple worlds together: Technicolor’s ode to Bollywood, which tells the story of a traveling Punjabi princess through space, was inspired by Indian percussion and an acid journey that Raveena took when discovering an oriental sound installation at the Rubin Museum.

The song was written a few years ago and captures what Raveena calls an exploration of a “more intense marriage between the sounds of Bollywood and the pop/R&B music” she grew up on. In the video, which she co-directed with director and photographer Munachi Osegbu, Raveena plays a character she invented called Asha, a Punjabi space princess who befriends the highly intelligent beings of a distant planet. They appear in the video as shimmering puddle-like figures that support Raveena as she performs playful choreography. As their dance sequences end, the song gently transitions into a delicate ballad, backed by the singer’s layered vocals.

After releasing his first album Lucid in 2019, Raveena dropped the four-song EP moon stone. Last year, she released the scintillating single “Tweety.”

From Rolling Stone United States.

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Xposure 2022 exhibitions mark a celebration of culture, adventure, beauty and more https://balibs.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-mark-a-celebration-of-culture-adventure-beauty-and-more/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 09:02:06 +0000 https://balibs.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-mark-a-celebration-of-culture-adventure-beauty-and-more/ Sharjah: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a premier global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that cross genres and formats and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity. Held for the first time over seven days […]]]>

Sharjah: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a premier global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that cross genres and formats and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity.

Held for the first time over seven days from February 9-15 at Expo Center Sharjah, Sharjah’s annual celebration of photography will host solo and group exhibitions showcasing a diverse range of photographic talent, including emerging contemporary photographers and established all over the world.

Collective exhibitions

Emirates Falcons Photography Society speaks to the soul of viewers through “Desert” which showcases the natural environment and beauty of the Arabian Desert, while “PSA Omnibus” mainly features works by local members of the Photographic Society of America (PSA).

Photographers from around the world whose images best express the idea that our future lies in peaceful coexistence will be represented in the “Global Peace Photo Award” exhibition, while images under “Siena International Photography Awards” feature works by professional and amateur photographers from all over the world.

“Into The Wild” is an exhibition from PhotoWalk Connect that explores wildlife photography through images of the wild and rugged landscapes of Kenya’s Masai Mara and an exciting array of creatures large and small. In “Revolution”, the visual evolution of the evolution of pop style is encapsulated through the defining images of the decade of the 1960s by three photographers – Terry O’Neill, Gered Mankowitz and Ed Caraeff.

The fascinating collection of images under ‘Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY)’ depicts various photographic styles including reportage, editorial, advertising, documentary, and offers insight into the stories behind these award-winning photographs. .

Personal exhibitions

Steve McCurry’s most memorable body of work, showcasing the perfect combination of light, composition and tonality and expressing the essence of humanity, is part of a retrospective titled “Iconic”. These images, shot over four decades, tell stories that cross the boundaries of language and culture.

Acclaimed photojournalist James Nachtwey’s ‘Unvanquished’ puts a human face to the social and political narratives of our time and documents history in the making through four decades of capturing conflict, disaster and disease across the globe, while the destruction and the humanitarian tragedy of war and its impact on human lives is eloquently portrayed in Muhammed Muheisen’s “Life and War” and Jana Andert’s “Inside the war on ISIS”.

Michel Rawicki offers an in-depth look at a region of the planet that is at the heart of climate change in “Call of the Cold”; Omar Havana talks about the struggles and resilience of the people of Nepal after a devastating earthquake in ‘Endurance’; Lurie Belegurschi captures the retreat of Icelandic glaciers in “Iceland: Land of Fire and Ice”; and Jordan Hammond shows the diversity of life found on the islands of Bali, Java and Sumbawa in “Indonesia”.

Ibrahim Iqbal, based in Bangladesh, raises issues of universal health care, disease prevention and unmet needs of lower socio-economic strata at ‘Aamar Hospital’; “Innocents” by Garcia de Marina is a symbolic representation of the prejudices and injustices of society; while in ‘Argish. Long way home’, Daniel Kordan captures the annual migration of people from the Yamal region of Russia.

George Georgiou criss-crossed 24 cities across the United States covering 26 parades to bring people, families, movement and a sea of ​​sound to life in “Americans Parade”; Frank Fournier portrays the fiery charm of New York in the mid-1970s in “Red Eye”; while Tariq Zaidi reveals the fashion culture of the capitals of Congo Kinshasa and Congo Brazzaville in ‘Sapeurs: Mesdames et Messieurs du Congo’.

Chris Rainier observes the deep spiritual significance and powerful connection of cultures around the world with ‘Mask’ and Biljana Jurukovski shares the beauty of the body paint and extravagant decorations of the tribes of Africa’s Omo Valley in ‘Tribal Muses – The Vanguard of the Tribal World’.

Kiran Ridley documents the human face of a social movement in “Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests: The Revolution of Our Time”; Gonçalo Fonseca’s images covering a period of 5 years show “How Portugal won the war on drugs”; Diego Ibarra Sánchez’s “Phoenician Collapse” is an intimate examination of Lebanon’s complex social mosaic at the time of an ongoing national economic crisis; and Debi Cornwall’s “Welcome to Camp America: Inside Guantánamo Bay” is a gripping exhibition marked by empathy and dark humor that investigates the human experience of prisoners and detention center guards.

The empty streets of Moscow – once a metropolis that never slept – become a visual metaphor for the changes brought about by the 2020 pandemic in Sergey Ponomarev’s ‘Moscow: The Great Void’; while Alan Schaller focuses on moments of positivity during COVID-19 in “Life Must Go On.”

Mogens Trolle zooms in on the faces and eyes of primates to capture their unique personalities in “Eye Contact”; Alain Schroeder launches an appeal to “Save the orangutans”; Aaron Gekoski Highlights Human-Animal Conflict To Portray ‘Wildlife In Crisis’; Jasper Doest Focuses on a Caribbean Flamingo to Highlight the Importance of Wildlife Protection in ‘Meet Bob’; and through “The Photo Ark”, Joel Sartore documents the amazing diversity of the world to inspire people to help save endangered species before it’s too late.

‘Andrew Prokos: New Abstraction’ features award-winning images of the fine art photographer’s large-scale architectural abstract prints; “Steven Brooke: Views of Rome and Miami” is the architectural photographer’s unique take on the historic architecture and neighborhoods of two magnificent cities; Majid Al Bastaki captures the beauty of the United Arab Emirates in ‘Now & Then – Celebrating 50 Golden Years’; while in “Uncluttered Sobriety II”, Sajin Sasidharan uses strong contrast in minimalist scenes to reveal incredible architectural details.

The beauty of macro photography comes to life in “The Hidden Beauty of Seeds and Fruits” by visual artist Levon Biss; Vineet Vohra transforms familiar scenes into something poetic and mystical in “Serendipity”; and Vidhyaa Chandramohan’s ‘UAE Female Falconers: Breaking Stereotypes’ evocatively captures the spirit of Emirati women entering a historically male-dominated hobby.

Four ocean explorers, researchers and storytellers will showcase the beauty and devastation that occurs in all ocean ecosystems through a series of exhibits titled “Ocean Mysteries”, “Our Water Planet”, “Secrets of the Whales” and “Two Worlds – Above and Below the Sea’ Underwater photographers drawing attention to marine conservation include Brian Skerry, David Doubilet, Jennifer Hayes and Laurent Ballesta

-Ends-

© Press release 2022

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Dance and music return to Bali, but not foreign tourists https://balibs.org/dance-and-music-return-to-bali-but-not-foreign-tourists/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 20:28:24 +0000 https://balibs.org/dance-and-music-return-to-bali-but-not-foreign-tourists/ Sir David Attenborough calls again to save plant life with BBC TV series ‘The Green Planet’ BOGOTA: Rising over 250 feet above the forest floor, California redwoods are the largest living things on the planet. It is at the foot of one of these 3,000-year-old giants that English broadcaster and nature historian Sir David Attenborough […]]]>


Sir David Attenborough calls again to save plant life with BBC TV series ‘The Green Planet’

BOGOTA: Rising over 250 feet above the forest floor, California redwoods are the largest living things on the planet.

It is at the foot of one of these 3,000-year-old giants that English broadcaster and nature historian Sir David Attenborough opens his new series, “The Green Planet”, which will air in the Middle East on beIN at from January 1st. ten.

“Plants, whether huge like this or microscopic, are the basis of all life, including ourselves,” the 95-year-old broadcaster said in the opening minutes of the first episode, titled “Tropical.”

“We depend on them for every bite of the food we eat and every breath of air we breathe,” he continues. “The plants are thriving in a remarkable way. Yet, for the most part, the secrets of their world have been kept from us. Until now.”

The BBC’s five-part production claims to offer a fresh take on the extraordinary world of plants. To do this, he would have used an array of pioneering technologies, from robotic platforms and drone cameras to time-lapse photography on the move, to ultra-detailed thermal cameras, to the stacking of deep focus macro images, to ultra-fast photography and the latest in microscopy.

The result is a series that turns the seemingly static world of trees and plants into a dynamic journey through a parallel universe in which plants are as aggressive, competitive and dramatic as wild animals, locked in a death struggle for food. , light and procreation.

Footage in the opening episode features time-lapse footage of leaf-cutting ants tearing down succulent leaves growing on a branch and carrying them to their underground lair, where a giant mushroom waits to feast on the mulch. The ants are rewarded for their efforts by the fungus with a constant supply of small mushrooms.

The footage illustrating this strange symbiosis was filmed over a three-week span deep in the Costa Rican rainforest, where cameramen struggled with their heavy equipment through dense jungle, braving episodes of torrential rain.

Sir David speaking at an event to kick off the United Nations climate change conference, COP26, in central London in February 2020 (AFP / File Photo)

According to the producers, the weather was not the only challenge they had to overcome. A crew filming footage in Borneo, for example, had to face their fair share of adversity after accidentally disturbing a nest of giant Asian hornets, causing nasty stings.

Later in the series, Sir David himself fell ill with a particularly thorny cactus known as cholla. Even though he was wearing a Kevlar liner with a welding glove on top, the plant’s dense rosette of thorns was able to pierce through the protection.

In another scene from Episode 1, viewers encounter a species of bat that, like ants and their friendly fungus, exists in perfect symbiosis with a night-blooming flower. It offers small mammals exclusive dives on its precious nectar in return for their services as chief pollinators.

Viewers also discover a rather repulsive-looking three-foot-wide parasitic plant known as the Corpse Flower, which mimics both the look and stench of rotting meat – with fur. and teeth – to attract pollinating flies.

Behind the scenes. Camera operator Oliver Mueller uses a specially designed robotic camera system known as the Triffid to film the Corpse Flower (Rafflesia keithii), Borneo. (Provided / BBC)

Covering 27 countries and produced over a period of four years, “The Green Planet” claims to offer the first comprehensive glimpse into the world of plants since the broadcast of Sir David’s previous series, “The Privacy of Plants”, 26 years ago. year.

“In ‘Private Life of Plants’ we were stuck with all this very heavy, primitive gear, but now we can take the cameras anywhere we want,” Sir David said in a recent interview.

“So now you have the option of going into a real forest, you can see a plant grow with its neighbors, fight with its neighbors, or move with its neighbors or die. And that’s, in my opinion, what brings it to life and what should make people say, ‘God damn it, these amazing organisms are like us.’ “

Over the course of the series, Sir David has traveled across the United States, Costa Rica, Croatia and northern Europe, from deserts to mountains, from rainforests to the frozen north, to create a new understanding of how plants live, experience the seasons and interact. with the animal world, including humanity.

Behind the scenes. Team doctor Dr Patrick Avery on a canopy tram in Costa Rica with Sir David and drone pilot Louis Rummer-Downing. Patrick has just launched a drone carrying a camera, which will film David’s journey through the canopy. (Provided / BBC)

The timing of the release of ‘The Green Planet’ could not be more critical, as many of the world’s ecosystems appear to be on the verge of collapse, with climate change, deforestation and pollution causing more and more weather events. extremes and loss of valuable biodiversity.

In the Middle East, for example, where temperatures regularly exceed 40 ° C for several months of the year, experts warn that climate change could soon make parts of the region uninhabitable for humans.

In response to the looming challenge, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have launched renewable energy initiatives, adopting green fuels such as wind, solar and hydrogen power. The two countries also enthusiastically participated in COP26, the United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Glasgow, Scotland, in November.

The previous month, Saudi Arabia launched its Saudi Green and Middle East Green initiatives, committing the Kingdom to achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2060 and to plant 10 billion trees over the next decades. , rehabilitating 8 million hectares of degraded land and creating new protected areas.

In the wings. Sir David standing among the giant sequoias, Sequoiadendron giganteum, the tallest trees in the world. California, United States. (Provided / BBC)

Sir David addressed world leaders at COP26 to stress the need to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prevent global temperatures from rising above 1.5 C above pre-industrial levels.

“Maybe the fact that the people most affected by climate change are no longer imaginary future generations but young people alive today… delegates.

“Our burning of fossil fuels, our destruction of nature, our approach to industry, construction and learning are releasing carbon into the atmosphere at an unprecedented rate and scale. We are already in trouble. The stability on which we all depend is being shattered.

Sir David should know. In a career spanning nearly seven decades, in which he has presented some of the most memorable nature documentaries ever made, he has witnessed this gradual destruction.

Clockwise from bottom: The Khasi family uses a living root bridge. Meghalaya, India; Saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), Sonoran Desert, Arizona. A mature saguaro can store 5,000 liters of water; and winter in the boreal forests of Finland. Spruce, pine and birch dominate this landscape. (Provided / BBC)

In 1937, when he was 11 years old, the world population was 2.3 billion and the amount of carbon in the atmosphere was 280 parts per million. Today, there are nearly 7.8 billion people on the planet, and the level of carbon in the atmosphere is around 415 parts per million.

Sir David joined the BBC in 1952 as an intern producer. While working on a series called “Zoo Quest”, between 1954 and 1964 he had his first opportunity to visit remote corners of the globe and capture images of wildlife in its natural habitats.

He left the cinema in 1965 to become the Controller of BBC2, a period during which he helped introduce color television to the UK, before becoming Program Director of BBC Television.

But in 1973, he decided to leave the administrative side of television and return to making documentaries.

Clockwise from L: A giant sequoia, Sequoiadendron giganteum, the tallest trees on Earth; the flowers of the “7 o’clock flower”, Merinthopodium neuranthom, are pollinated by the Underwood long-tongue bat (Hylonycteris underwoodi); and the giant water lily, species Victoria, in the Pantanal region of Brazil. (Supplied / BBC / Paul Williams)

He quickly established himself as Britain’s best-known natural history programmer, presenting “Life on Earth” in 1979 and “The Blue Planet” in 2001.

It is thanks to this cinema life, and of course his sweet and instantly recognizable storytelling, that Sir David is now at the forefront of issues related to the conservation and decline of the planet’s species – and is regarded as a treasure trove. British national.

“The world suddenly became aware of plants,” he said recently. “There was a revolution around the world in attitudes towards the natural world during my lifetime. Awakening and awareness of the importance of the natural world to all of us. A realization that we would starve without plants, we would not be able to breathe without plants.

Sir David believes the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting lockdowns have encouraged people to pay more attention to the plant life around them.

Sir David is now at the forefront of issues relating to the conservation and decline of the planet’s species – and is considered a UK national treasure. (AFP / File Photos)

“I think that being locked up and confined in your garden, if you are lucky enough to have a garden – and if not, to have plants on a shelf – has changed the way people look and the consciousness of a another world that exists that we hardly ever pay attention to, ”he said.

So what does he hope the public will take away from “The Green Planet”?

“That there is a parallel world on which we depend and which, until now, we have largely ignored, if I speak for the urbanized man,” he said.

“More than half of the world’s population, according to the UN, is urbanized, lives in cities, sees only cultivated plants and never sees a community of wild plants.

“But this wild community is there, outside of normal urban circumstances, and we depend on it. And we better take good care of it.


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masala bhangra: Sarina Jain teaches New Yorkers Masala Bhangra to dance away from the pandemic blues https://balibs.org/masala-bhangra-sarina-jain-teaches-new-yorkers-masala-bhangra-to-dance-away-from-the-pandemic-blues/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/masala-bhangra-sarina-jain-teaches-new-yorkers-masala-bhangra-to-dance-away-from-the-pandemic-blues/ Sarina Jain created her Masala Bhangra dance program, a fusion of the traditional Punjabi dance form and Western fitness, over two decades ago. A lifestyle program where Dhol drum beats meet Bollywood glamour; with easy-to-follow choreography, for people of all ages, is how she describes it. “The concept of Masala Bhangra was created in my […]]]>
Sarina Jain created her Masala Bhangra dance program, a fusion of the traditional Punjabi dance form and Western fitness, over two decades ago. A lifestyle program where Dhol drum beats meet Bollywood glamour; with easy-to-follow choreography, for people of all ages, is how she describes it. “The concept of Masala Bhangra was created in my garage 21 years ago and today it is one of the top five workout programs in the United States,” Jain told TIMESOFINDIA.com from New York. where she lives. She has produced over 15 workout videos and appointed 250 Masala Bhangra Ambassadors who proudly represent Indian culture to their students. “I also launched an on-demand gym program where anyone in the world can dance anytime,” she says.

Born and raised in Southern California by her Indian parents who immigrated to the United States in the 70s, Jain says she grew up with the best of what the West has to offer without forgetting the East. “My dad made sure to send us to India every summer to spend time with our family members, our grandparents and to learn to appreciate what Indian culture is,” she recalls. And having grown up in Southern California, surrounded by the Indian culture of her family, it was not difficult for her to bring together her two passions of culture and fitness. It was her father, she recalls, who taught her to respect the culture where they came from, to be independent and to stand tall. His sudden death, after a massive cardiac arrest, when he was only 47 years old, was a great shock. But her father’s death also inspired her to create Masala Bhangra to honor his memory. “I wanted to tell her that not only am I proud to be an Indian woman living in the United States, but now I teach aspects of our culture through fitness.”
Jain did not formally learn bhangra, but was drawn to it in her youth. “I danced with a team called Dhamaka. We did many dance competitions and often won first place,” she recalls. And that’s where the confidence to launch a form of Indian dance into the fitness world in the United States comes from. Now it’s popular all over the world, she says proudly. Although she continues to grow her brand, she turned to offering virtual classes as soon as the lockdown hit due to Covid restrictions in the US. “When the pandemic hit, everyone was confused. But a week after the shutdown, Masala Bhangra’s instructors adapted to the virtual terrain and took off. It was trial and error at first, but we made it. We’ve been offline for a year and a half and it’s working,” she says.
Later in 2021, after the first lockdown was lifted, Jain launched the concept of ‘Bhangra in the Plaza’ outdoor sessions to get New York moving again, as she describes it. “I produced this event for New Yorkers to get out of their homes, hang out and dance with us. Also promote culture and bring people together through Indian music and dance. It was a huge success,” says The business model she follows now is hybrid, with people of all ages and fitness levels in the United States and even from different parts of the world able to attend classes or participate in “ gym on demand.” Masala Bhangra events are held indoors and outdoors. The program’s USP, even after 21 years, remains high-energy Bhangra and Bollywood dance moves in an easy fitness format to follow, says Jain.
She considers herself lucky to have grown up in the United States amid Indian and Western cultures. “I grew up with a large desi community and was super involved in all activities. I was also brought up in the environment of what the west had to offer. I loved my upbringing and I hope to bring that to my children. Indian culture is important to me, that’s why I promote it every day through Masala Bhangra,” she says. She has a lot of extended family in India and visits often. am also married in Jaipur,” she said.

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XP Music Conference connects Arab culture to the world https://balibs.org/xp-music-conference-connects-arab-culture-to-the-world/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 14:26:40 +0000 https://balibs.org/xp-music-conference-connects-arab-culture-to-the-world/ Craig David presents TS5 Who: Multi-talented British pop star from Southampton who shot to fame as a teenager. His debut album “Born to Do It”, released in 2000, was the best-selling debut album by a British male solo artist. His decline in popularity was just as rapid—helped in part by his becoming an object of […]]]>

Craig David presents TS5

Who: Multi-talented British pop star from Southampton who shot to fame as a teenager. His debut album “Born to Do It”, released in 2000, was the best-selling debut album by a British male solo artist. His decline in popularity was just as rapid—helped in part by his becoming an object of ridicule on the TV show “Bo’ Selecta!” After a string of mediocre albums that sold less and less well, he seemed doomed to obscurity. However, now 40, David, singer-songwriter, DJ, rapper and producer, has regained much of the credibility he had lost. TS5 is an alter-ego that David first revealed in 2012 when he was a DJ at pre-parties he hosted in his Miami penthouse (TS5 is the apartment number). It has since morphed into a project that combines many of his passions – DJing, rapping, singing and occasionally performing with a live band. He has a new album due out this year.

Genre: R&B, dance pop.

Best known for: 1999’s ‘Re-Rewind’, a collaboration with Artful Dodger that became one of the most recognized UK garage tunes and helped bring garage music into the mainstream.

In his own words: “My songs are a time stamp for many people’s lives.”

James Blunt

Who: English singer-songwriter loved by people for whom Coldplay might be “a little pissed off.” The former soldier enjoyed a meteoric rise with his debut album, ‘Back to Bedlam’ in 2004, which sold over 11 million copies worldwide. He became a divisive figure – ridiculed by many for what they saw as bland, tasteless music better suited to background noise at fancy dinner parties, but defended by just as much for writing easy-listening classics. He is now hugely popular on social media for his self-deprecating humor, which has forced many to re-evaluate their opinion of him. Expect to hear many examples of his spirit on stage in Diriyah.

Genre: Pop rock.

Best known for: 2005’s “You’re Beautiful,” which seemed to be on constant rotation on radio stations around the world for the next 10 years.

In his own words: “Proof that one song is all you need.”

Wyclef Jean

Who: Haitian rapper, multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter, actor and three-time Grammy winner who first gained attention as a member of American alternative hip-hop group Fugees (along with his cousin Pras Michel and Lauryn Hill), whose second album, 1996’s “The Score” became one of the best-selling LPs of all time. When they parted ways, Jean went on to a successful solo career, with 13 studio albums to her name and wildly popular collaborations with Mary J. Blige, Lil Wayne, Destiny’s Child and Shakira, among others. He also made headlines in 2010, when he announced his intention to run in the Haitian presidential elections. He was ultimately deemed ineligible because he had not been a resident for the required length of time.

Genre: Hip-hop, R&B, neo-soul.

Best known for: “Gone till November”, released in 1997, from his first solo album “The Carnival”. This earworm had orchestral accompaniment provided by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra.

In his own words, “I would say the music resonates if you base your stories on real events.”

Two door cinema

Who: The leftmost selection of this year’s Diriyah E-Prix lineup, this Irish trio – frontman Alex Trimble, lead guitarist Sam Halliday and bassist and keyboardist Kevin Baird – are UK festival alumni who have formed while still in high school (as Life Without Rory) and recorded their self-recorded debut EP in 2008. “Four Words to Stand On” gained an online following (it wasn’t officially released until in 2018) and the group began to generate buzz through their concerts. Their debut studio album, “Tourist History”, showcased Two Door Cinema Club’s talent for blending catchy, angular indie-pop music with literary lyricism and earned comparisons with Editors, Bloc Party and Futureheads. After a not-quite-acrimonious breakup around 2014, when Trimble was, he said, “depressed and stressed out,” the band overcame their differences and continued to perform together.

Genres: Indie rock, post punk.

Best known for: “What You Know”, released in 2011 – the fifth single from “Tourist History”. It didn’t sell particularly well, but was picked up by Microsoft for online advertisements for Outlook.

In their own words: “There is a lot of very safe music out there. We wanted to have fun and do something really interesting.

The scenario

Who: Another Irish trio (lead singer Danny O’Donoghue, lead guitarist Mark Sheehan and drummer Glen Power), The Script formed in 2007 and were soon signed to Sony’s Photogenic. Their self-titled debut album, released in 2008, spawned three hit singles and reached number one in Ireland and the UK (as did their next three albums). Their lighter wave radio anthems have been featured on numerous TV shows and The Script has sold over 20 million albums to date. Initially met with skepticism by rock fans (thanks in large part to the fact that O’Donoghue and Sheehan were once part of a boy band called Mytown), they have since gained respect (perhaps reluctantly at first) for their undeniably catchy songwriting (they wrote for Britney Spears and Boyz II Men, among others, before becoming famous) and musicianship.

Genre: Pop rock.

Best Known For: Their second single, the 2008 stadium anthem, “The Man Who Can’t Be Moved.” Or perhaps the 2010 stadium anthem that sings “Breeven,” their first American single, which sold over a million copies in the United States.

In their own words: “I think a lot of musicians would turn around and say, if you’re trying to (fit in), you’re wrong. Personally, I think they are idiots. If you’re not using the tools to make a great radio record, you’re not doing your job.

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New Savage Plane features dance floor and veranda https://balibs.org/new-savage-plane-features-dance-floor-and-veranda/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/new-savage-plane-features-dance-floor-and-veranda/ The veranda on Explorer. Photo: Lufthansa Technik A German design company has come up with the ultimate status symbol, a concept plane savage for one percent of the world. Called the Explorer, the refurbished A330 has a nightclub, glass floor, gym, garage, four double bedrooms and a veranda (for use on the floor only) . […]]]>


A German design company has come up with the ultimate status symbol, a concept plane savage for one percent of the world.

Called the Explorer, the refurbished A330 has a nightclub, glass floor, gym, garage, four double bedrooms and a veranda (for use on the floor only) .

A projection system also covers the walls and ceiling of the aircraft and will play out a range of backgrounds – including an underwater world and outer space.

Lufthansa Technik is behind the concept and Wieland Timm, VIP Sales Manager & Special Mission Aircraft Services, likens the design to a superyacht.

“In yacht building, multifunctional exploration vessels have now become a class of their own. And many owners of these ships also call a plane theirs, ”said Timm.

“For this rapidly growing target group of explorers from the VIP world, we have therefore created a flying platform for the first time.

“Unlike a yacht, however, our Explorer aircraft allows passengers to travel across the globe in hours and establish their own individual base camp for other activities. This opens up whole new possibilities for explorers. . “

The design accommodates 12 passengers, but the concept can be reconfigured to carry up to 47 people.

Lufthansa Technik, which is a sister company of the German airline, showcased the design at the recent Dubai Air Show. Obviously, the plane is not cheap. It has a price tag of over A $ 604 million.

The luxury private jet market has exploded during the pandemic, as the wealthy invest in ways to avoid the crowds.

In the United States, private jet operators say they have seen an unprecedented increase in business that has almost brought private jet charters back to pre-pandemic levels.

The pandemic has also not slowed the production and design of luxury aircraft.

In September, Qatar Airways presented the world’s first $ 105 million Gulfstream G700 luxury jet. According to the airline, it has the most spacious cabin in the industry, with “an extra-large kitchen with lounge or crew compartment, up to five living areas and a spacious and unprecedented large suite with en-suite bathroom. private “.

Stuff.co.nz

See also: “The world’s best airline” presents the new Dreamliner, the new business class

See also: Economy double-decker cabin design provides more passenger space


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Donald Trump’s sculpture of Mount Rushmore with his face on it PHOTO for the first time in his Mar-a-Lago office https://balibs.org/donald-trumps-sculpture-of-mount-rushmore-with-his-face-on-it-photo-for-the-first-time-in-his-mar-a-lago-office/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/donald-trumps-sculpture-of-mount-rushmore-with-his-face-on-it-photo-for-the-first-time-in-his-mar-a-lago-office/ AN INFAMOUS sculpture of Donald Trump’s face carved into Mount Rushmore has been pictured for the first time – sitting on a shelf in his office at Mar-a-Lago. It has long been reported that Trump has a small statue of the famous landmark, including its distinctive features, given to him by South Dakota Governor Kristi […]]]>

AN INFAMOUS sculpture of Donald Trump’s face carved into Mount Rushmore has been pictured for the first time – sitting on a shelf in his office at Mar-a-Lago.

It has long been reported that Trump has a small statue of the famous landmark, including its distinctive features, given to him by South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem.

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Trump’s sculpture of Mount Rushmore with his face added can be seen on the lower shelf of the table
The sculpture adds Trump's face as the fifth head on the famous monument

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The sculpture adds Trump’s face as the fifth head on the famous monument
A model of the sculpture which was released by the artist earlier this year

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A model of the sculpture which was released by the artist earlier this year

Models of the statue have been released before – but now, for the first time, the object itself has been photographed.

The 75-year-old can be seen beaming in a posed photo as he receives an honorary black belt from Taekwondo World Headquarters.

To her left, sitting on the lower shelf of a console table is the mini version of the monument.

You can see George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

And then bolted to the end next to The Great Emancipator is a new fifth addition on the rock face – Trump.

You can clearly see his famous hair and a sculpted version of the collar and tie.

The statue features under a shelf that includes a MAGA hat and under hanging photos of the presidency, such as meeting North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un.

It is believed to be the first time the infamous sculpture has been pictured in Trump’s possession amid rampant speculation.

And it has been reported that Trump himself is very fond of the idea of ​​him ever joining Mount Rushmore.

And the 45th president earlier this year said he would already be there if he was a Democrat.

Trump reportedly received the 1-foot-wide, 27-inch-tall bronze sculpture of Governor Noem as he visited the monument to deliver a speech on July 3, 2020.

It is understood that the Trump is slightly taller than other presidents and that the sculpture was funded by private donations.

The artwork cost $1,100.

The team of sculptors Lee Leuning and Sherri Treeby – two Trump supporters who voted for him in 2016, 2020 and plan to do so in 2024 – created Governor Noem’s artwork.

I started laughing he wasn’t laughing so he was totally serious

Governor Kristi Noem

It has been reported that the White House has contacted the governor’s office to inquire about him having actually added his mug to the monument in the Black Hills.

“What is the process for adding additional presidents to Mount Rushmore?” a Trump administration official reportedly asked.

His team pushed back and Trump himself called it “fake news” – but it appears the president wasn’t opposed to the idea.

Trump tweeted: “Based on all the many things accomplished in the first 3 1/2 years, perhaps more than any other presidency, this sounds like a great idea to me!

Governor Noem claims Trump told him it was his “dream” to be carved into Mount Rushmore.

“He’s like, ‘You know it’s my dream to have my face on Mount Rushmore?'” she said.

“I started laughing, he wasn’t laughing so he was totally serious.”

Trump would like the idea of ​​being added to Mount Rushmore

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Trump would like the idea of ​​being added to Mount RushmoreCredit: AP

The four presidents featured on the mountain were chosen by sculptor Gutzon Borglum in the 1920s.

They were meant to represent the four phases of American history so far – from independence to the industrial revolution.

And the original plans actually included the presidents from head to waist, until the funding ran out.

It is believed that the ground is not stable enough to build a fifth face.

But there have been talks of another addition with suitors such as Ronald Reagan, JFK and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Trump’s predecessor Barack Obama joked about his addition, but joked that his ears were too big.

And in a 2018 survey by The New York Times, Roosevelt – who led the United States during World War II – was picked as the frontrunner.

Trump weighs in on Kyle Rittenhouse, says teen would’ve ‘died if he didn’t pull the trigger’ in deadly Kenosha riot

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Korean Diocese to revitalize missionary activities with culture https://balibs.org/korean-diocese-to-revitalize-missionary-activities-with-culture/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/korean-diocese-to-revitalize-missionary-activities-with-culture/ The Diocese of Incheon in South Korea has created a new committee to revitalize missionary activities and evangelism through culture and the arts. The initiative is part of the diocese’s programs to mark its 60th anniversary of founding and the 200th anniversary of the birth of Saint Andrew Kim Tae-gon, the first Korean priest martyred […]]]>

The Diocese of Incheon in South Korea has created a new committee to revitalize missionary activities and evangelism through culture and the arts.

The initiative is part of the diocese’s programs to mark its 60th anniversary of founding and the 200th anniversary of the birth of Saint Andrew Kim Tae-gon, the first Korean priest martyred in the 19th century.

The diocese established the six-member culture and arts committee on Nov. 5 with Father Kim Il-hoe as chairman, reports Korea Catholic Time. All members have experience and expertise in culture and the arts, including music.

The committee is responsible for the preparation and implementation of cultural projects including exhibition and performance spaces to enable believers and non-believers to participate in activities to express their love for culture and the arts. Catholics.

Father Kim, chairman of the committee, said the new body is timely because the diocese has organized a series of cultural and artistic events this year, not only for Catholics but for all in collaboration with the public authorities of the city of ‘Incheon.

“We plan to prepare a variety of events that believers and citizens of the territory of Incheon Diocese can participate in together, such as art and photography exhibitions,” Fr. Kim said.

The committee will organize the Sea Star Culture and Arts Festival and Peace All Together Festival in June 2022

The formation of the committee follows the establishment of the Peter Lee Yi Seung-hun Memorial and Historical Park at Jangsu-dong in Incheon in collaboration with the city authorities. Lee (1756-1801) was among Korea’s first Catholic martyrs.

The committee will organize the Sea Star Culture and Arts Festival and the Peace All Together Festival in June 2022 at St. Mary’s Hall in the Diocese. In October, in collaboration with the Association of Catholic Artists, the committee will organize a photography exhibition at the Incheon Arts Center which will be open to all citizens.

In November, a concert is planned to celebrate the establishment of the Peter Lee Yi Seung-hun memorial at the Incheon Arts Center and a music festival for young people and adults (19-45 years old) at the Boniface Auditorium of the Diocese of Incheon .

Incheon Diocese was established as an Apostolic Vicariate by Pope John XXIII on June 6, 1961. It was elevated to a diocese on March 10, 1962.

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It covers Incheon, a bustling port city of 2.8 million people and a business and transportation hub that includes the huge, state-of-the-art Incheon International Airport, the largest and one of the busiest in the country. .

Incheon is one of the largest dioceses with approximately 500,000 Catholics in some 122 parishes.

About 56% of the estimated 58 million South Koreans have no religion, 20% are Protestant, 8% are Catholic and 15.5% are Buddhist, according to government records.

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