large scale – Balibs http://balibs.org/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 18:28:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://balibs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png large scale – Balibs http://balibs.org/ 32 32 A rat made of RAT: the COVID sculpture made from medical waste to boost the recycling effort https://balibs.org/a-rat-made-of-rat-the-covid-sculpture-made-from-medical-waste-to-boost-the-recycling-effort/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/a-rat-made-of-rat-the-covid-sculpture-made-from-medical-waste-to-boost-the-recycling-effort/ Tens of thousands of single-use rapid antigen tests (RATs) are used every day in Australia, but where the hell do they all end up? Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of a non-profit organization Mullum careasks his community to deliver his used rapid antigen tests, despite concerns about the biological risks involved. Watch the video above to learn […]]]>

Tens of thousands of single-use rapid antigen tests (RATs) are used every day in Australia, but where the hell do they all end up?

Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of a non-profit organization Mullum careasks his community to deliver his used rapid antigen tests, despite concerns about the biological risks involved.

Watch the video above to learn about the best RAT tests and how to use them

To express his frustration In line with government inaction, Ms Mainsbridge has decided to take matters into her own hands with her own PPE, in a bid to demonstrate that recycling RATs is possible in her call for a national approach.

The goal of this RAT recycling project is to collect 50 kg of used test kits, reuse the plastic and feed it into a large 3D printer build a sculpture which would be publicly erected to highlight the cause.

His message to those outside Byron Shire in North East New South Wales is that people are ‘hanging on to them’ until a recycling method can be determined.

“We want to do this as a project to demonstrate that it can be done. If we can do that, then a larger-scale recycling system can certainly be put in place. »

Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of Mullum Cares, asks her local community to bring in their used RATs to make a recycling declaration. Credit: Provided

Tens of thousands of tons of additional medical waste resulting from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic have strained medical waste management systems around the world, according to a new report from the World Health Organization.

A spokesperson for Environment Minister Sussan Ley told 7NEWS.com.au in response: ‘While it is important to recycle at every opportunity, we must also recognize that rapid antigen tests are classed as medical waste and that there is clear state and territory disposal requirements.

“The outer cardboard boxes can be recycled and the torch batteries should certainly be recycled via in-store collection points, but it’s important that people follow the correct guidelines.”

An NSW vet has also posted on social media about UV torches often included in rapid antigen test kits, saying some veterinary clinics may accept them as nurses use the torches to test animals for ringworm.

NSW Health said the test kits may contain pathogens that can be easily transmitted to others, and requested that all test kit materials used are disposed of in a biohazard waste bag.

A giant rat made of RAT

The sculptor involved in the project, Studio Kite director Steven Rosewell, plans to use a chipper to first chip the RATs into a fine grain, with the final design depending on how many they are able to collect.

If they collect the planned amount, the sculpture could take the form of a ‘big rat with a human face’ which Mr Rosewell said would be symbolic of the waste problem and, laughingly, ‘what rats we all are’ .

Studio Kite's Barangaroo Lion was printed using Mr. Rosewell's 3D printer, with compartments inside for soil and plants.
Studio Kite’s Barangaroo Lion was printed using Mr. Rosewell’s 3D printer, with compartments inside for soil and plants. Credit: Provided

His studio has previously created large-scale public artworks, including the Barangaroo lion and the sound cloud for Vivid Festival, with a 3D printer he designed and built himself, known as CADZilla.

“It’s just about getting people’s attention to the whole waste problem…it’s not just the fact that we’re using all these single-use plastics, it’s everything else we’re using as well” , Mr. Rosewell said.

“Steve assumes after looking at a RAT test himself, that it will be fine to put them in his machine, intact with the strips inside, but that’s something we’ll have to prove,” Ms Mainsbridge said.

“It creates a pretty big barrier if it fails. It can still be done, but it just adds another step to the process.

“COVID-19 has forced the world to address the gaps and overlooked aspects of the waste stream” – Dr Maria Neira, Director of the Department of Public Health and Environment, WHO

WHO Director of the Department of Public Health and Environment, Dr Maria Neira, said: “COVID-19 has forced the world to address the gaps and overlooked aspects of the waste stream and how we produce, use and dispose of our healthcare resources, from cradle to grave.

Tens of thousands of tons of additional medical waste resulting from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic have strained medical waste management systems around the world, according to a new report from the World Health Organization.

“What we are doing is just a demonstration, our organization is not trying to become a recycling company,” Ms Mainsbridge said, hoping for national reform.

“People are nervous”

The WHO report says the additional waste produced during the pandemic threatens human and environmental health and reveals an urgent need to improve waste management practices.

Printer cartridge and sanitary waste disposal processes are a good place to start looking for possible solutions, says Ms. Mainsbridge.

“What’s really important with these systems is that they are collected by trained people, so any risks can be easily managed.”

Ms Mainsbridge says staff trained in waste disposal would be key to the national RAT recycling scheme.
Ms Mainsbridge says staff trained in waste disposal would be key to the national RAT recycling scheme. Credit: DANIEL POCKET/AAP picture

Asked how she was tracking the recycling pilot and test collection, Ms Mainsbridge said: ‘That’s the tricky part. People are nervous, people are really nervous.”

With only a few pounds in her collection so far, Sasha approaches operating stores which she thinks might be ready to have collection bins, but says, “There is a lot of concern around the biohazard element. The challenge at the moment is to make it more convenient for people to drop them off.

“We advocate for extended producer responsibility in the form of a collection bin program where every place you buy a RAT has a collection bin,” Ms Mainsbridge wrote on her website.

“Why shouldn’t it be the responsibility of the manufacturer and the seller to manage end-of-life materials? »

“People are nervous, people are really nervous” – Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of Mullum Cares

Currently, Ms Mainsbridge says she decontaminates hand-delivered RATs using the COVID wash station at her organization, submerging the kits in sterilization solution for three days.

Likewise, Mr. Rosewell isn’t overly concerned that the project involves the processing of biohazardous materials.

He says he would be equally nervous to deal with general waste due to the large number of people unaware they are living with COVID, normally throwing away contaminated food waste and single-use drink bottles.

“The actual number of cases in the community is likely much higher than what is being reported,” Queensland Health Minister Yvette D’Ath said of a first of its kind. ranomized COVID test study.

This study sampled 117 households and found that while 20 households tested positive, only two of them already knew they were positive.

“Pool” of chemical waste

The WHO indicates that from 140 million test kits, it is possible to generate 2,600 tons of non-infectious waste, mainly plastic, and 731,000 liters of chemical waste, which is equivalent to a third of a swimming pool. Olympic size. .

Their report calls for reform and investmentwith recommendations including support for centralized treatment and investment in the recycling sector to ensure that materials like plastics can have a second life.

A warehouse full of rapid antigen tests.
A warehouse full of rapid antigen tests. Credit: Scott Dalton/PA

“In the face of COVID-19, the sustainable management of healthcare waste is more important than ever to protect communities, healthcare workers and the planet and to prevent pollution,” said Ruth Stringer, science and policy coordinator of Health Care Without Harm.

A WHO statement says the COVID-19 waste challenge presents an opportunity to strengthen systems to safely and sustainably reduce and manage healthcare waste.

“This can come through strong national policies and regulations, regular monitoring and reporting and increased accountability, support for behavior change and workforce development, and increased budgets and funding .

“Systemic change in the way healthcare manages its waste would include more thorough and systematic review and better procurement practices,” said healthcare waste task force chair Dr. Anne Woolridge.

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The world’s largest sculpture will be built in the desert of the United Arab Emirates https://balibs.org/the-worlds-largest-sculpture-will-be-built-in-the-desert-of-the-united-arab-emirates/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/the-worlds-largest-sculpture-will-be-built-in-the-desert-of-the-united-arab-emirates/ Travel Jan 24, 2022 8:00 PM2 minute read A model of the Mastaba of Abu Dhabi. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation Christo and Jeanne-Claude have created some pretty incredible works in their lifetime. Transcending traditional boundaries of painting, sculpture and architecture, husband and wife wrapped the Reichstag in Berlin in fabric in 1995. […]]]>
Travel

A model of the Mastaba of Abu Dhabi. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation

Christo and Jeanne-Claude have created some pretty incredible works in their lifetime.

Transcending traditional boundaries of painting, sculpture and architecture, husband and wife wrapped the Reichstag in Berlin in fabric in 1995.

Ten years later, they built a catwalk of saffron-colored fabric panels in Central Park, New York, for a play called “The Gates”.

After Jean-Claude’s death in 2009 and Christo’s passing in May 2020, their project to wrap the Arc de Triomphe in Paris in material came to life in 2021.

The Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped, Paris, 1961-2021.  Photo / Benjamin Loyseau, 2021 Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation
The Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped, Paris, 1961-2021. Photo / Benjamin Loyseau, 2021 Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation

The temporary artwork was on display for 16 days, from September 18 to Sunday October 3.

Fabric wasn’t the only medium the couple used.

Beginning in 1958, artists used barrels as a means of creating a strong physical presence. Sculptural, yet inexpensive, Christo often took storage drums from a yard next to his studio in France and explored stacking them to impressive heights in unusual places.

Despite their passing, the projects of their artistic enterprise will live on and are expected to break records as the largest permanent sculpture in the world.

Christo in his studio with preparatory work for Le Mastaba in 2012. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Fondation Christo et Jeanne-Claude
Christo in his studio with preparatory work for Le Mastaba in 2012. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Fondation Christo et Jeanne-Claude

Titled “The Mastaba,” the project will be the world’s largest permanent work of art and will use 410,000 multicolored barrels to create a colorful mosaic that mimics Islamic architecture.

Christo in his studio with a preparatory drawing for Le Mastaba in 1984. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation.
Christo in his studio with a preparatory drawing for Le Mastaba in 1984. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation.

Located in the Liwa Desert of the EUA, about 160 kilometers south of Abu Dhabi, it will stand 150 meters high, 300 meters wide and 225 meters deep.

The plans for the sculpture were first conceived in 1979 after Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s first visit to the United Arab Emirates.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude looking for a possible site for Le Mastaba in 1982. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation
Christo and Jeanne-Claude looking for a possible site for Le Mastaba in 1982. Photo: Wolfgang Volz, Christo and Jeanne-Claude Foundation

The Mastaba will be their only permanent large-scale public artwork.

Once government approval is finalized, mark 2027 on your calendars as construction is estimated to take three years.

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Xposure 2022 exhibitions celebrate culture https://balibs.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-celebrate-culture/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 09:05:04 +0000 https://balibs.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-celebrate-culture/ Sharjah24: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a leading global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that transcend genres and formats, and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity. First held over seven days February 9-15 at […]]]>


Sharjah24: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a leading global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that transcend genres and formats, and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity.
First held over seven days February 9-15 at Expo Center Sharjah, the annual Sharjah Photography Celebration will host solo and group exhibitions showcasing a diverse range of photographic talent, including emerging contemporary photographers. and established all over the world.

From breathtaking nature-inspired visuals and stories that offer hope and inspiration to powerful visuals that offer fascinating insight into personal experiences, historical events and more, the exhibits at Xposure 2022 will engage audiences and attract a wider audience to the art and appreciation of photography. The annual festival also serves as a platform to propel the region’s emerging photographers onto the international stage.

Group exhibitions

Emirates Falcons Photography Society speaks to the souls of viewers through “Desert” which showcases the natural environment and beauty of the Arabian Desert, while “PSA Omnibus” features works primarily by members of the local chapter of the Photographic Society of America (PSA).

Photographers from around the world whose photos best express the idea that our future lies in peaceful coexistence will be featured in the “Global Peace Photo Award” exhibition, while the images under “Siena International Photography Awards” feature works by professional and amateur photographers from all over the world.

“Into The Wild” is an exhibition by PhotoWalk Connect that explores wildlife photography through images of the rugged and rugged landscapes of Kenya’s Masai Mara and an exciting array of creatures large and small. In “Revolution” the visual evolution of the evolution of the pop style is summarized through the defining images of the 1960s by three photographers – Terry O’Neill, Gered Mankowitz and Ed Caraeff.

The fascinating collection of images under “Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY)” describes different styles of photography including reportage, editorial, advertising, documentary and offers insight into the stories behind these award-winning photographs.

Personal exhibitions

Steve McCurry’s most memorable collection of works showcasing the perfect combination of light, composition and tone and which conveys the essence of humanity is part of a retrospective titled “Iconic”. These images, shot over four decades, tell stories that transcend the boundaries of language and culture.

Famous photojournalist James Nachtwey’s “Unvanquished” gives a human face to the social and political narratives of our time and documents the history being drawn through four decades of capturing conflict, disaster and disease across the world, while destruction and the humanitarian tragedy of war and its impact on human lives is eloquently portrayed in “Life and War” by Muhammed Muheisen and “Inside the war on ISIS” by Jana Andert.

Michel Rawicki offers an in-depth look at a region of the planet at the heart of climate change in “Call of the Cold”; Omar Havana talks about the struggles and resilience of the Nepalese people following a devastating earthquake in “Endurance”; Lurie Belegurschi captures the retreating Icelandic glaciers in “Iceland: the land of fire and ice”; and Jordan Hammond shows the diversity of life found on the islands of Bali, Java and Sumbawa in “Indonesia”.

Ibrahim Iqbal, based in Bangladesh, raises issues of universal health care, disease prevention and unmet needs of lower socio-economic strata of “Aamar Hospital”; Garcia de Marina’s “Innocents” are a symbolic representation of prejudices and injustices in society; while in ‘Argish. Long way home ‘, Daniel Kordan captures the annual migration of people from the Yamal region of Russia.

George Georgiou has toured 24 US cities spanning 26 parades to bring people, families, movement and a sea of ​​sound to life in “Americans Parade”; Frank Fournier portrays the fiery charm of New York City in the mid-1970s in ‘Red Eye’; while Tariq Zaidi reveals the fashion culture of the capitals of Congo Kinshasa and Congo Brazzaville in “Sapeurs: Mesdames et Messieurs du Congo”.

Chris Rainier observes the deep spiritual significance and powerful relationship of cultures around the world with ‘Mask’ and Biljana Jurukovski shares the beauty of body painting and extravagant decorations of the Omo Valley tribes in Africa in ‘Tribal Muses – The Vanguard of the Tribal World ‘.

Kiran Ridley documents the human face of a social movement in “Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests: The Revolution of Our Time”; Images by Gonçalo Fonseca covering a period of 5 years show “How Portugal won the war on drugs”; Diego Ibarra Sánchez’s “The Phoenician Collapse” is an intimate examination of the complex Lebanese social mosaic at the time of an ongoing national economic crisis; and “Welcome to Camp America: Inside Guantánamo Bay” by Debi Cornwall is a compelling exhibit marked by empathy and dark humor that investigates the human experience of prisoners and detention center guards.

The empty streets of Moscow – once a metropolis that never slept – become a visual metaphor for the changes brought about by the 2020 pandemic in Sergey Ponomarev’s “Moscow: The Great Void”; while Alan Schaller focuses on the moments of positivity during COVID-19 in ‘Life Must Go On’.

Mogens Trolle zooms in on the faces and eyes of primates to capture their unique personalities in “Eye Contact”; Alain Schroeder launches a call to “Save the orangutans”; Aaron Gekoski emphasizes human-animal conflict to portray “Wildlife in Crisis”; Jasper Doest focuses on a Caribbean flamingo to highlight the importance of protecting wildlife in “Meet Bob”; and through ‘The Photo Ark’, Joel Sartore documents the amazing diversity of the world to inspire people to help save endangered species before it’s too late.

“Andrew Prokos: New Abstraction” features award-winning images of the art photographer’s large-scale architectural abstract prints; “Steven Brooke: Views of Rome & Miami” is the architectural photographer’s unique take on historic architecture and neighborhoods in two magnificent cities; Majid Al Bastaki captures the beauty of the UAE in “Now and then – Celebrating 50 Golden Years”; while in ‘Uncluttered Sobriety II’, Sajin Sasidharan uses strong contrast in minimalist scenes to reveal incredible architectural details.

The beauty of macro photography comes to life in “The Hidden Beauty of Seeds and Fruits” by visual artist Levon Biss; Vineet Vohra transforms familiar scenes into something poetic and mystical in “Serendipity”; and “UAE Female Falconers: Breaking Stereotypes” by Vidhyaa Chandramohan evocatively captures the minds of Emirati women entering a historically male-dominated hobby.

Four ocean explorers, researchers and storytellers will showcase the beauty and devastation that occurs in all ocean ecosystems through a series of exhibits entitled “The Mysteries of the Ocean”, “Our Aquatic Planet”, “The Secrets of the Whales” and ‘Two Worlds – Above and Below the Sea’. Underwater photographers drawing attention to marine conservation include Brian Skerry, David Doubilet, Jennifer Hayes and Laurent Ballesta


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Xposure 2022 exhibitions mark a celebration of culture, adventure, beauty and more https://balibs.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-mark-a-celebration-of-culture-adventure-beauty-and-more/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 09:02:06 +0000 https://balibs.org/xposure-2022-exhibitions-mark-a-celebration-of-culture-adventure-beauty-and-more/ Sharjah: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a premier global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that cross genres and formats and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity. Held for the first time over seven days […]]]>

Sharjah: The sixth edition of the Xposure International Photography Festival, a premier global event dedicated to celebrating the art of photography, will bring to Sharjah a wide range of stunning images from around the world that cross genres and formats and celebrate culture, beauty, adventure and humanity.

Held for the first time over seven days from February 9-15 at Expo Center Sharjah, Sharjah’s annual celebration of photography will host solo and group exhibitions showcasing a diverse range of photographic talent, including emerging contemporary photographers and established all over the world.

Collective exhibitions

Emirates Falcons Photography Society speaks to the soul of viewers through “Desert” which showcases the natural environment and beauty of the Arabian Desert, while “PSA Omnibus” mainly features works by local members of the Photographic Society of America (PSA).

Photographers from around the world whose images best express the idea that our future lies in peaceful coexistence will be represented in the “Global Peace Photo Award” exhibition, while images under “Siena International Photography Awards” feature works by professional and amateur photographers from all over the world.

“Into The Wild” is an exhibition from PhotoWalk Connect that explores wildlife photography through images of the wild and rugged landscapes of Kenya’s Masai Mara and an exciting array of creatures large and small. In “Revolution”, the visual evolution of the evolution of pop style is encapsulated through the defining images of the decade of the 1960s by three photographers – Terry O’Neill, Gered Mankowitz and Ed Caraeff.

The fascinating collection of images under ‘Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY)’ depicts various photographic styles including reportage, editorial, advertising, documentary, and offers insight into the stories behind these award-winning photographs. .

Personal exhibitions

Steve McCurry’s most memorable body of work, showcasing the perfect combination of light, composition and tonality and expressing the essence of humanity, is part of a retrospective titled “Iconic”. These images, shot over four decades, tell stories that cross the boundaries of language and culture.

Acclaimed photojournalist James Nachtwey’s ‘Unvanquished’ puts a human face to the social and political narratives of our time and documents history in the making through four decades of capturing conflict, disaster and disease across the globe, while the destruction and the humanitarian tragedy of war and its impact on human lives is eloquently portrayed in Muhammed Muheisen’s “Life and War” and Jana Andert’s “Inside the war on ISIS”.

Michel Rawicki offers an in-depth look at a region of the planet that is at the heart of climate change in “Call of the Cold”; Omar Havana talks about the struggles and resilience of the people of Nepal after a devastating earthquake in ‘Endurance’; Lurie Belegurschi captures the retreat of Icelandic glaciers in “Iceland: Land of Fire and Ice”; and Jordan Hammond shows the diversity of life found on the islands of Bali, Java and Sumbawa in “Indonesia”.

Ibrahim Iqbal, based in Bangladesh, raises issues of universal health care, disease prevention and unmet needs of lower socio-economic strata at ‘Aamar Hospital’; “Innocents” by Garcia de Marina is a symbolic representation of the prejudices and injustices of society; while in ‘Argish. Long way home’, Daniel Kordan captures the annual migration of people from the Yamal region of Russia.

George Georgiou criss-crossed 24 cities across the United States covering 26 parades to bring people, families, movement and a sea of ​​sound to life in “Americans Parade”; Frank Fournier portrays the fiery charm of New York in the mid-1970s in “Red Eye”; while Tariq Zaidi reveals the fashion culture of the capitals of Congo Kinshasa and Congo Brazzaville in ‘Sapeurs: Mesdames et Messieurs du Congo’.

Chris Rainier observes the deep spiritual significance and powerful connection of cultures around the world with ‘Mask’ and Biljana Jurukovski shares the beauty of the body paint and extravagant decorations of the tribes of Africa’s Omo Valley in ‘Tribal Muses – The Vanguard of the Tribal World’.

Kiran Ridley documents the human face of a social movement in “Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests: The Revolution of Our Time”; Gonçalo Fonseca’s images covering a period of 5 years show “How Portugal won the war on drugs”; Diego Ibarra Sánchez’s “Phoenician Collapse” is an intimate examination of Lebanon’s complex social mosaic at the time of an ongoing national economic crisis; and Debi Cornwall’s “Welcome to Camp America: Inside Guantánamo Bay” is a gripping exhibition marked by empathy and dark humor that investigates the human experience of prisoners and detention center guards.

The empty streets of Moscow – once a metropolis that never slept – become a visual metaphor for the changes brought about by the 2020 pandemic in Sergey Ponomarev’s ‘Moscow: The Great Void’; while Alan Schaller focuses on moments of positivity during COVID-19 in “Life Must Go On.”

Mogens Trolle zooms in on the faces and eyes of primates to capture their unique personalities in “Eye Contact”; Alain Schroeder launches an appeal to “Save the orangutans”; Aaron Gekoski Highlights Human-Animal Conflict To Portray ‘Wildlife In Crisis’; Jasper Doest Focuses on a Caribbean Flamingo to Highlight the Importance of Wildlife Protection in ‘Meet Bob’; and through “The Photo Ark”, Joel Sartore documents the amazing diversity of the world to inspire people to help save endangered species before it’s too late.

‘Andrew Prokos: New Abstraction’ features award-winning images of the fine art photographer’s large-scale architectural abstract prints; “Steven Brooke: Views of Rome and Miami” is the architectural photographer’s unique take on the historic architecture and neighborhoods of two magnificent cities; Majid Al Bastaki captures the beauty of the United Arab Emirates in ‘Now & Then – Celebrating 50 Golden Years’; while in “Uncluttered Sobriety II”, Sajin Sasidharan uses strong contrast in minimalist scenes to reveal incredible architectural details.

The beauty of macro photography comes to life in “The Hidden Beauty of Seeds and Fruits” by visual artist Levon Biss; Vineet Vohra transforms familiar scenes into something poetic and mystical in “Serendipity”; and Vidhyaa Chandramohan’s ‘UAE Female Falconers: Breaking Stereotypes’ evocatively captures the spirit of Emirati women entering a historically male-dominated hobby.

Four ocean explorers, researchers and storytellers will showcase the beauty and devastation that occurs in all ocean ecosystems through a series of exhibits titled “Ocean Mysteries”, “Our Water Planet”, “Secrets of the Whales” and “Two Worlds – Above and Below the Sea’ Underwater photographers drawing attention to marine conservation include Brian Skerry, David Doubilet, Jennifer Hayes and Laurent Ballesta

-Ends-

© Press release 2022

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hirshhorn museum wins approval for hiroshi sugimoto sculpture garden revitalization https://balibs.org/hirshhorn-museum-wins-approval-for-hiroshi-sugimoto-sculpture-garden-revitalization/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/hirshhorn-museum-wins-approval-for-hiroshi-sugimoto-sculpture-garden-revitalization/ hirshhorn sculpture garden revitalization project approved a milestone is inevitable for the famous smithsonian hirshhorn museum in washington dc next to a online meeting on March 10, 2021 where information about the revitalization project was unveiled, Hiroshi Sugimoto sculpture garden revitalization design approved. the architect’s project elevates the visitor experience, blending original elements from 1974 […]]]>

hirshhorn sculpture garden revitalization project approved

a milestone is inevitable for the famous smithsonian hirshhorn museum in washington dc next to a online meeting on March 10, 2021 where information about the revitalization project was unveiled, Hiroshi Sugimoto sculpture garden revitalization design approved. the architect’s project elevates the visitor experience, blending original elements from 1974 with contemporary additions. By defining changes ranging from revised footpaths to atmospheric water pool features, a cohesive and interconnected Hirshhorn Campus is taking a stand.

‘sugimoto’s vision is very much aligned with the original influences of the garden but looks to the future. our next chapter is more inclusive and accessible and elevates the experiences and voices of today,” says hirshhorn director Melissa Chiu.

(above) rendering view of the east garden

(banner) looking south from the central gallery aisle
all images courtesy of hirshhorn museum and sculpture garden

japanese architect hiroshi sugimoto improves the experience of millions of visitors

following the unanimous approval of the national commission capital planning commission (CNPC) and the commission of fine arts (CFA) for Hiroshi Sugimoto design proposal, hirshhorn the revitalization of the sculpture garden came closer on July 15 when the CFA approved its final design. then, the project’s mission to unify the sculpture garden, plaza and museum will begin its new journey. as the space improves, the design manages to increase by nearly 50% the reception of modernist bronzes in the museum.

“We welcome these approvals, which followed a robust public process that allowed us to hear and incorporate the views of so many people who care deeply about the garden. the final design by acclaimed japanese artist and architect hiroshi sugimoto will enhance the experience of millions of visitors to hirshhorn for years to come,’ continue melissa chiu.

hirshhorn museum wins approval for hiroshi sugimoto sculpture garden revitalization
hirshhorn sculpture garden path with lowered concrete retaining wall

walking platforms provide flexible spaces for sculpture and performance art

maintaining the layered design history of the garden is one of the main aims of the project. in the central garden, sugimoto expands the water feature into a flexible performance space. The 1974 bunshaft reflecting pool will remain filled year round, heated if required. an enlarged water feature separated by a five-foot walkway is fitted with terraced steps surrounds an art platform, providing flexible space for sculpture and performance art. the visual connection is restored with various seating arrangements all around.

meanwhile, the design revisits the existing interior partition wall by transforming it into a pylon-like lower stacked stone structure. Inspired by Japanese dry stacking techniques, the modernist reconstruction provides a distinctive optical and acoustic backdrop during performances. overall, the dynamics of the garden are transformed into a harmonious entity of curatorial options, functions and views.

hirshhorn museum wins approval for hiroshi sugimoto sculpture garden revitalization
rendering of the west garden at night with a large scale order

sugimoto’s design achieves two important goals: to make the sculpture garden more accessible and inviting to the 30 million people who pass through it each year on the national mall, and to provide flexible venues for types of large-scale sculptures and works. based on time and performance which are the characteristics of today’s contemporary art. the organic proposal responds sensitively to art as site-specific installations, sculptures of various sizes, as well as dynamic galleries can all be adapted and enjoyed throughout the year. moreover, as accessibility via infrastructure is also improved, visitor comfort is achieved whether through unobstructed views, optimal acoustics or shaded seating.

‘it is an honor to be commissioned to revitalize and renew the hirshhorn sculpture garden. my design acknowledges the contributions of gordon bunshaft, the original architect of the hirshhorn, and lester collins, who reconsidered the garden in 1981. my challenge is to anticipate how art will be created, displayed and shared in an environment public. as an artist, I’m thrilled the proposal was accepted and can’t wait to bring it to life,” said the architect himself, hiroshi sugimoto.

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2021 K-POP Global Concert (K-Culture Festival) Concludes Successfully, Showcasing New Pattern of Performances in the Era of “Life with COVID-19” https://balibs.org/2021-k-pop-global-concert-k-culture-festival-concludes-successfully-showcasing-new-pattern-of-performances-in-the-era-of-life-with-covid-19/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/2021-k-pop-global-concert-k-culture-festival-concludes-successfully-showcasing-new-pattern-of-performances-in-the-era-of-life-with-covid-19/ – Closed spectacular performances held for two days from November 13 to 14, with the participation of various high profile local and international artists – Participation of 2.63 million Hallyu fans worldwide (as of November 18) Seoul, South Korea–(ANTARA/Business Wire)- ‘2021 World K-POP Concert (K-Culture Festival)’ held from November 13 (Saturday) to 14 (Sunday) at […]]]>

– Closed spectacular performances held for two days from November 13 to 14, with the participation of various high profile local and international artists

– Participation of 2.63 million Hallyu fans worldwide (as of November 18)

Seoul, South Korea–(ANTARA/Business Wire)- ‘2021 World K-POP Concert (K-Culture Festival)’ held from November 13 (Saturday) to 14 (Sunday) at the Korea International Exhibition Center ( KINTEX) in Goyang -si, ended successfully with huge support from Hallyu fans around the world.

Jointly organized by the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Korea (MCST, Minister Hwang Hee) and the Korea Foundation for International Cultural Exchange (KOFICE, President Jung Kil-hwa), this concert attracted attention from fans as it was the first large-scale offline event prepared by the government since the implementation of the ‘living with COVID-19’ program to initiate a gradual return to normal life.

This year’s event was organized with particular attention to infection prevention measures by implementing the “vaccine pass” and “people counting” systems. First, fully vaccinated people who passed the two-week mark after completing their second dose or those who presented proof of PCR test results via a confirmation letter or text message within 48 hours were allowed to enter the site.

In the case of the global K-POP concert (BIT 4 U concert) held on November 14, stricter disease prevention procedures were implemented, where all seats were allocated in accordance with the measures of social distancing, and visitors were given vinyl gloves upon entry. to wear them at all times. In addition, crowd cheering and chanting during performances and changing seats were strictly prohibited – the priority being safety.

Held under strict security measures, the total number of global Hallyu fans who attended the concert online and offline amounted to approximately 2.63 million, making the festival even more meaningful. In particular, about 3,000 on-site visitors were able to witness the scorching performances of Hallyu artists, and 150,000 fans from all over the world simultaneously enjoyed the festival broadcast live via KOFICE’s official YouTube channel.

Local artists such as NCT DREAM, SHINee KEY, aespa, ITZY, PENTAGON, Simon Dominic, Loco and BraveGirls as well as American pop star Kehlani performed at the event, and MCST Minister Hwang Hee spoke virtually joined the concert and gave greetings from France with a French Hallyu fan. SHINee KEY, who made the grand finale, said, “Although we are not used to seeing a concert hall without shouting, building on this momentum, I hope more artists can have the opportunity to perform on stage in the living with COVID-19 era.

MCST and KOFICE extend their special invitation to medical personnel and public personnel who have worked hard to overcome COVID-19, as well as multicultural families and culturally disadvantaged foreigners living in Korea to share messages of hope to overcome the pandemic situation through performance.

The recordings of this concert will be broadcast on various channels such as Mnet, TVING and tvN Asia on November 28, December 5 and 6, inspiring global audiences once again.

Meanwhile, KOFICE will hold the virtual conference “The History of K-POP and the Future of Vision” on November 30 as an additional program of the K-POP Global Concert. Organized under the theme of K-pop and the cultural politics of popular music, the conference will be broadcast live and in real time via the official YouTube channel of the K-Cultural Festival.

contacts

For the Korea Foundation for International Cultural Exchange (KOFICE)

Edelman Korea

Olivia John

+82-2-2022-8260

Young Woo Kim

+82-2-2022-8237

Source: Korea Foundation for International Cultural Exchange (KOFICE)

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Carol Bove’s Material Illusions at the Nasher Sculpture Center https://balibs.org/carol-boves-material-illusions-at-the-nasher-sculpture-center/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/carol-boves-material-illusions-at-the-nasher-sculpture-center/ Carol Bove at the Nasher Sculpture Center: rust, ripples and material illusion At the Nasher Sculpture Center, Texas, an exhibition by American artist Carol Bove examines 20th century traditions and pushes metal to its limits At the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas, TX, “Carol Bove: Collage Sculptures” marks the first major museum presentation focused solely […]]]>


Carol Bove at the Nasher Sculpture Center: rust, ripples and material illusion

At the Nasher Sculpture Center, Texas, an exhibition by American artist Carol Bove examines 20th century traditions and pushes metal to its limits

At the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas, TX, “Carol Bove: Collage Sculptures” marks the first major museum presentation focused solely on the American artist’s assembled steel sculptures.

The exhibition features nine “sculpture-collages” (as the artist calls them), from the past five years, two of which were made especially for Nasher’s exhibition. From a monumental outdoor sculpture to an intimate tabletop composition, the exhibition highlights the versatility of Bove’s work; a lesson in materiality.

“Carol Bove is an artist of extraordinary diversity and subtlety,” says director Jeremy Strick, director of the Nasher Sculpture Center. “His work skillfully extends traditional sculptural precedents into revealing new forms, both physically and conceptually fresh, that confuse and delight. “

Bove, who has just installed four sculptures on the facade of Met Fifth Avenue in New York City, is adept at making the sturdiest materials appear malleable, pliable and flexible, as if they could wave or warp in the wind, or wrinkle like a fabric. As the artist vividly describes, these sculptures are “a story of movement and pressure, of strength and gentleness”.

By welding and bolting together different shapes of steel and shaping the material with a variety of tools, Bove finds new possibilities in found and industrial materials, and new potential in sculptural traditions previously considered exhausted. We see raw rust-riddled scrap combined with tube-like shapes covered in dense, matte color layers that suggest something altogether more synthesized, digitally rendered and immune to elemental destruction.

“The materials, processes, and syntax of Bove’s nascent sculptures struck me as deeply familiar, but there were, excitingly, elements of the unknown, as if this long-familiar approach to sculpture could lead to places not still imagined, ”said curator Catherine. Craft seeing the first iterations of Bove’s new work.

Bove’s bold use of color and form also refers to 20th century sculpture traditions: from the yellow hues of Willem de Kooning to the cadmium red favored by Donald Judd to emphasize line and texture; and the mid-century public sculpture by Mark di Suvero, Richard Serra and John Chamberlain.

Continuing a 20th-century thought-provoking theme, Bove and Craft have curated a separate exhibition of small works, miniatures, scale models, and models by artists such as Alberto Giacometti, Pablo Picasso, and Henry Moore, who examine many large-scale experiments. §


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Phyllida Barlow to Unveil Five Meter High Sculpture at Highgate Cemetery | Phyllida barlow https://balibs.org/phyllida-barlow-to-unveil-five-meter-high-sculpture-at-highgate-cemetery-phyllida-barlow/ https://balibs.org/phyllida-barlow-to-unveil-five-meter-high-sculpture-at-highgate-cemetery-phyllida-barlow/#respond Mon, 21 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/phyllida-barlow-to-unveil-five-meter-high-sculpture-at-highgate-cemetery-phyllida-barlow/ This summer, visitors to Highgate Cemetery in north London will be greeted with something that stands out – tall, wide and beautiful – amid familiar gravestones, famous follies and grand Victorian mausoleums. Phyllida Barlow – the artist who rose to fame in her 70s after a career as a teacher during which she taught Douglas […]]]>


This summer, visitors to Highgate Cemetery in north London will be greeted with something that stands out – tall, wide and beautiful – amid familiar gravestones, famous follies and grand Victorian mausoleums.

Phyllida Barlow – the artist who rose to fame in her 70s after a career as a teacher during which she taught Douglas Gordon, Tacita Dean and Martin Creed – will install a new sculpture titled Act which she hopes it will challenge visitors to reassess the cemetery and its monuments.

Act will be 5.6 meters high, five meters deep and seven meters wide, Barlow describing it as a scene which includes a “tower of poles wrapped in cloth” and is inspired by the grandiose setting of the cemetery and the obsession Victorian style to honor the dead.

“It responds to our relationship with cemeteries and this Victorian idea of ​​death as something absolutely monumental that needs monuments to honor it in this very correct and deep way,” she said. “I guess I took the theatrical aspect of it to create a kind of stage.”

Barlow – who is known for her large-scale and sprawling works which found their most mainstream when she represented the UK at the 2017 Venice Biennale – said Act “echoes” her pavilion work in the sense that he wonders if a job like his belongs to certain places. “I hope that sounds very wrong,” she said.

“I’m interested in forgery and claim I like the theatrical issues it raises, but also slightly out of place compared to the more intentional objects, such as the mausoleums for which Highgate is so famous.”

Originally commissioned by Studio Voltaire in 2019 to sit in Nunhead Cemetery, Act was moved after the structure it was supposed to occupy was deemed unsafe and underwent maintenance work.

The original version of the sculpture was deemed too small to sit in the space of Highgate Cemetery, which is in the open-air courtyard of the West Cemetery, so Barlow enlarged the work, adding three meters additional.

Another work by Barlow, untitled: stack; 2019, Cement, burlap, paint, plywood, polycotton, spray paint, steel, wood Photography: Damian Griffiths

“It’s a complicated site because it’s Grade I listed, even though we’re not doing anything permanent,” said Voltaire artistic director Joe Scotland. “It was really important that we were working with a structural engineer just to make sure everyone was safe, and it wasn’t going to hurt anyone.”

Barlow added that the backdrop for Brexit hung over her pavilion in Venice, which consisted of huge gray sculptures of styrofoam, paint, concrete and wire mesh, and some of those themes she explored in Italy are on display again. at Highgate.

“The idea of ​​forgery and phantom grandeur has become quite important to the works of Venice and, in a strange way, this is reflected in what I intended to do here. “

The site in Highgate Cemetery.
The site in Highgate Cemetery. Photograph: Courtesy of Highgate Cemetery

Created in Barlow’s studio in north London, the work will be transferred to the Grade I listed site and built over the course of a week. The work will then remain in place for six weeks over the summer.

Barlow was able to visit the site, which is a short distance from his home in Finsbury Park. The visit was a change for the artist, who during the pandemic had to install works in Munich, Los Angeles and Tokyo using Zoom and other remote working tools.

She said cemeteries and the visual language used to accompany headstones and graves had always fascinated her. “What is the message contained in these forms and why use this classical architecture? Why is this so important for the commemoration of the death – it intrigues me, ”she said.

Act will be another attraction for the thousands of visitors who come to the cemetery to see the architecture, scenery and the last resting places of famous residents including Karl Marx and George Eliot.

The cemetery has around 100,000 paying visitors a year, land costs £ 20,000 there and it recently unveiled plans for an exhibition space, a separate gift shop and a cafe.

Ian Dungavell, general manager of Friends of Highgate Cemetery, said cemeteries were “19th century outdoor sculpture parks” and that Act had similarities to this tradition.

He said: “Barlow’s sculpture will be in the courtyard of Highgate Cemetery, between the urban bustle outside and the peaceful tranquility of the burial landscape. Its themes are quite appropriate to the decor. We hope that it will inspire visitors as well as the monuments of the 19th century.


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In Miami, a sculpture made to live https://balibs.org/in-miami-a-sculpture-made-to-live/ Tue, 04 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/in-miami-a-sculpture-made-to-live/ Christopher Carter regularly uses reclaimed wood, faded rope, tarnished metal, and other found materials to create his large-scale sculptures. So when the Miami-based artist needed a new studio and started dreaming about building a live workspace, he knew it would involve a lot of reused components. What he didn’t know was that he would eventually […]]]>


Christopher Carter regularly uses reclaimed wood, faded rope, tarnished metal, and other found materials to create his large-scale sculptures. So when the Miami-based artist needed a new studio and started dreaming about building a live workspace, he knew it would involve a lot of reused components. What he didn’t know was that he would eventually be the subject of an exhibition, “The Carter Project,” which opens on May 15 at the NSU Art Museum in Fort Lauderdale.

“I sketched out some ideas with a friend of mine on what my ideal space would be,” said Carter, 54. “And it was a bit like converting a gas station into a loft. “

He had salvaged pieces that he wanted to work with, as he was already experimenting in his art with old shipping containers and spiral staircases. “I thought it would be really fun to play with them like Legos,” he said. “Stack them up, move them around and see what I can find. “

Mr. Carter searched for a run-down warehouse or other commercial property to reinvent, but struggled to find one that he felt was right. Then his wife, Tracey Robertson Carter, 52, a board member of a few organizations focused on music, art and sustainability, found a tight corner against Interstate 95 in the Wynwood neighborhood. and suggested he take a look.

The property had an uninspiring three-bedroom house and a go-cart track in need of demolition, but it was surrounded by mature avocado, mango and oak trees which gave it the impression of a lush garden. And as Mr. Carter surveyed the land, he realized it was bigger than it looked, with almost 0.4 acres – enough space to build not just a house and a studio, but also an exhibition space.

The couple bought the lot for around $ 450,000 in early 2016, and Mr. Carter stepped up his sketches. Ms Robertson Carter knew her husband would need a collaborator with a grasp of structural issues and the building code who would also be open to unconventional ideas, so she called Gary Williams, an architect and creative thinker from Fort Lauderdale, as the couple. had met in a few artistic events.

At first, Mr. Williams objected and offered to help them find another architect. But after meeting Mr. Carter and listening to his vision for the project, he was won over.

“He had containers on spikes so he had already tried to move forward,” said Williams. “He had a plan. He just didn’t know how he was going to get there.

Working closely over the next seven months, the two developed designs for an actual workspace of 8,755 square feet. In the center of the complex is a large hangar-like room with a 26-foot ceiling and a pair of huge steel and glass doors that roll up to open a wall onto the courtyard. Outside, an industrial-scale canopy supported by steel trusses provides shade.

Most of the time, the great room is furnished with a sectional sofa, lounge chairs, a pool table, and a 15-foot-long dining table that Mr. Carter made from planks and wood. Redwood beams salvaged from a Rhode Island paper mill. But two large voids in the concrete floor, covered with more reclaimed wood, can store the furniture when the couple want to transform the space for an exhibition or event.

Connected to the great room is a somewhat more intimate, albeit still spacious, living space with a sitting area and kitchen with walnut cabinets. NanaWall folding glass doors connect the kitchen to an outdoor cooking space and patio, and a reclaimed redwood and glass staircase leads up to the master suite.

On the other side of the great hall, a composition of six shipping containers and two spiral staircases houses a library, a gym, a studio and a workshop. A cantilevered container peeking out among the treetops is a suite for the couple’s daughter, Skylar, 20, who uses it on her visits. In the yard, an Airstream trailer that served as Mr. Carter’s temporary office awaits a further transformation.

The house was largely completed in late 2018, for a total of around $ 1.5 million, and the couple moved in on Christmas Eve that year. But even before construction was complete, Bonnie Clearwater, director and chief curator of the NSU Art Museum in Fort Lauderdale, decided it was intriguing enough to warrant a dedicated exhibit. The resulting spectacle will remain on view throughout the fall, with a virtual reality experience, a 3D printed model and drawings that showcase Mr. Carter’s live workspace, along with other examples. from his work.

“Her sculptural work would be described as an assemblage – bringing together materials found in unique ways,” Ms. Clearwater said. “So when he started talking about reusing shipping containers and other household materials, I could see how this related to his practice as a sculptor. “

Mr. Carter’s foray into building living spaces reminded him of the work of other artists who experimented with architecture, including Frank Stella, Julian Schnabel, and Jorge Pardo. “There is a completely different way of working as an artist with architecture, as opposed to an architect creating architecture,” she said.

Mr. Carter seemed to agree. “I consider this to be my biggest sculpture,” he said.

But Ms Robertson Carter has made it clear that the building is more than an art installation. “Even with the shipping containers, scraps and stuff,” she said, “at the end of the day, this is our home.”

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OMA / shohei shigematsu design ‘ReefLine’ public underwater sculpture park in Miami Beach https://balibs.org/oma-shohei-shigematsu-design-reefline-public-underwater-sculpture-park-in-miami-beach/ https://balibs.org/oma-shohei-shigematsu-design-reefline-public-underwater-sculpture-park-in-miami-beach/#respond Thu, 19 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/oma-shohei-shigematsu-design-reefline-public-underwater-sculpture-park-in-miami-beach/ OMA / shohei shigematsu designed miami beach’s first public underwater sculpture park, snorkeling trail and man-made reef. “ReefLine” will function as an artificial reef to protect and preserve the city’s marine life and coastal resilience and provide critical habitat for endangered reef organisms, promoting biodiversity and enhancing coastal resilience. The OMA will design the master […]]]>


OMA / shohei shigematsu designed miami beach’s first public underwater sculpture park, snorkeling trail and man-made reef. “ReefLine” will function as an artificial reef to protect and preserve the city’s marine life and coastal resilience and provide critical habitat for endangered reef organisms, promoting biodiversity and enhancing coastal resilience. The OMA will design the master plan for the ReefLine as well as a separate sculpture inside, working with a team of expert marine biologists, researchers, architects and coastal engineers. “The ReefLine is unique because it draws attention to and mitigates the dangers of climate change in Miami, while simultaneously enriching the city’s vibrant arts scene,”“says shohei shigematsu, partner of OMA. “We look forward to working with the diverse group of experts and professionals on our first underwater cultural and sculpture master plan. “

all images courtesy of the OMA

Stretching over 11 kilometers, Reefline is a large-scale environmental public art project designed by cultural venue creator Ximena Caminos, who will serve as the artistic director of the project, and preservation company bluelab. for the master plan, OMA designed a geometric and concrete modular unit that can be deployed and stacked from the beach from south to north, following the topography of the seabed. the living breakwater is the connective tissue of the overall masterplan and will be punctuated by a series of site-specific installations.

OMA reef line

“ReefLine” will be completed in several phases, with the first kilometer due to open in December 2021. the first phase will open with permanent installations by argentinian artist leandro erlich and shohei shigematsu / OMA. erlich will create an underwater embodiment of his sand-sculpted “traffic jam”, which was commissioned by the city of miami beach during miami beach art week 2019. titled “concrete coral”, the specific installation at the site will reframe cars and trucks – symbols of emissions that put our planet at risk – as new vehicles for environmental change.

OMA / shigematsu sculpture explores the nature of weightlessness underwater. the staircase, a rudimentary architectural element, has gone out of its usual context and transformed into underwater madness. a series of winding spiral staircases create a three-dimensional structure reminiscent of marine life. the organic form provides layered areas for coral reef growth and interstitial spaces for exploration, while the stairs revolve around a central forum for underwater activities.

Meanwhile, artists Ernesto Neto and Agustina Woodgate were selected for subsequent commissions.

OMA reef line

“This series of artist-designed and science-lit artificial reefs will demonstrate to the world how tourism, artistic expression and the habitat critical to creation can be aligned,” said ximena caminos. “The ReefLine is a unique investment in civic infrastructure, public art and environmental protection that will pay dividends for decades to come and attract environmentally conscious tourists and art lovers to Miami. “ ReefLine was developed in collaboration with coral morphology researchers and the University of Miami and supported by the City of Miami Beach.

OMA / shohei shigematsu design 'ReefLine' public underwater sculpture park in Miami Beach

OMA / shohei shigematsu design 'ReefLine' public underwater sculpture park in Miami Beach

OMA / shohei shigematsu design 'ReefLine' public underwater sculpture park in Miami Beach

Direction ReefLine

artistic director & founder: Ximena Paths
main planner: Shohei Shigemastu / OMA
conservation advisers: brandi reddick, cultural affairs manager, city of miami beach and jérôme sanz, independent curator

Advisory Board:
katherine fleming, founder and managing director, bridge initiative
colin foord, marine biologist and founder, morphological coral
brian k. haus, professor and chair of the department of ocean sciences, university of miami
diego lirman, ph.d., associate professor, university of miami
tori linder, program director + impact producer, panther path
landolfrhode-barbarigos, assistant professor, department of civil, architectural and environmental engineering, university of miami
Elizabeth Wheaton, Environment and Sustainable Development Department, City of Miami Beach

nina azzarello I design boom

November 19, 2020



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