covid pandemic – Balibs http://balibs.org/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 18:27:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://balibs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png covid pandemic – Balibs http://balibs.org/ 32 32 Cops help dance teacher who lost his life to Covid – The New Indian Express https://balibs.org/cops-help-dance-teacher-who-lost-his-life-to-covid-the-new-indian-express/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 03:20:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/cops-help-dance-teacher-who-lost-his-life-to-covid-the-new-indian-express/ By Express press service NEW DELHI: Distraught after losing his livelihood in Mumbai due to the Covid-19 pandemic last year, 44-year-old dance teacher Balaji Sawalkar has arrived in the city to start his life over. But he found no takers for his dancing skills in the nation’s capital. When he ran out of money, he […]]]>

By Express press service

NEW DELHI: Distraught after losing his livelihood in Mumbai due to the Covid-19 pandemic last year, 44-year-old dance teacher Balaji Sawalkar has arrived in the city to start his life over. But he found no takers for his dancing skills in the nation’s capital. When he ran out of money, he started living in the “rain basera”, an overnight shelter for the homeless.

Delhi police found him and helped him find a job in a restaurant. Sawalkar said he was a professional dancer and had been performing for 20 years. He said he opened a dance academy called ‘Bali step of dance classes’ at Saki Naka in Mumbai in 2013.

He said he also has a registered company named ‘Bali Events and Entertainment LLP’ but it is closed at the moment. “I had a dance institute in Mumbai which was closed due to Covid-19 as the premises were rented out and I had no funds left to run it. I ran out of money and left
Bombay,” he said.

He reached the national capital by train on Diwali on November 4 last year to explore more possibilities. “I was initially living in Bangla Sahib Gurudwara. Later I moved to nearby overnight shelter. Arrangements are good and we are getting food. help earn a living,” Sawalkar said.

He added: “I joined Sandoz at Connaught Place in the food packaging department. I was told that I would receive Rs 18,000 salary per month. My goal is to continue as a dance teacher. But for now, I have decided to work for a living,” he said. Sawalkar said, “I did two world tours. I’ve performed in almost every Bollywood awards show.

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A rat made of RAT: the COVID sculpture made from medical waste to boost the recycling effort https://balibs.org/a-rat-made-of-rat-the-covid-sculpture-made-from-medical-waste-to-boost-the-recycling-effort/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/a-rat-made-of-rat-the-covid-sculpture-made-from-medical-waste-to-boost-the-recycling-effort/ Tens of thousands of single-use rapid antigen tests (RATs) are used every day in Australia, but where the hell do they all end up? Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of a non-profit organization Mullum careasks his community to deliver his used rapid antigen tests, despite concerns about the biological risks involved. Watch the video above to learn […]]]>

Tens of thousands of single-use rapid antigen tests (RATs) are used every day in Australia, but where the hell do they all end up?

Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of a non-profit organization Mullum careasks his community to deliver his used rapid antigen tests, despite concerns about the biological risks involved.

Watch the video above to learn about the best RAT tests and how to use them

To express his frustration In line with government inaction, Ms Mainsbridge has decided to take matters into her own hands with her own PPE, in a bid to demonstrate that recycling RATs is possible in her call for a national approach.

The goal of this RAT recycling project is to collect 50 kg of used test kits, reuse the plastic and feed it into a large 3D printer build a sculpture which would be publicly erected to highlight the cause.

His message to those outside Byron Shire in North East New South Wales is that people are ‘hanging on to them’ until a recycling method can be determined.

“We want to do this as a project to demonstrate that it can be done. If we can do that, then a larger-scale recycling system can certainly be put in place. »

Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of Mullum Cares, asks her local community to bring in their used RATs to make a recycling declaration. Credit: Provided

Tens of thousands of tons of additional medical waste resulting from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic have strained medical waste management systems around the world, according to a new report from the World Health Organization.

A spokesperson for Environment Minister Sussan Ley told 7NEWS.com.au in response: ‘While it is important to recycle at every opportunity, we must also recognize that rapid antigen tests are classed as medical waste and that there is clear state and territory disposal requirements.

“The outer cardboard boxes can be recycled and the torch batteries should certainly be recycled via in-store collection points, but it’s important that people follow the correct guidelines.”

An NSW vet has also posted on social media about UV torches often included in rapid antigen test kits, saying some veterinary clinics may accept them as nurses use the torches to test animals for ringworm.

NSW Health said the test kits may contain pathogens that can be easily transmitted to others, and requested that all test kit materials used are disposed of in a biohazard waste bag.

A giant rat made of RAT

The sculptor involved in the project, Studio Kite director Steven Rosewell, plans to use a chipper to first chip the RATs into a fine grain, with the final design depending on how many they are able to collect.

If they collect the planned amount, the sculpture could take the form of a ‘big rat with a human face’ which Mr Rosewell said would be symbolic of the waste problem and, laughingly, ‘what rats we all are’ .

Studio Kite's Barangaroo Lion was printed using Mr. Rosewell's 3D printer, with compartments inside for soil and plants.
Studio Kite’s Barangaroo Lion was printed using Mr. Rosewell’s 3D printer, with compartments inside for soil and plants. Credit: Provided

His studio has previously created large-scale public artworks, including the Barangaroo lion and the sound cloud for Vivid Festival, with a 3D printer he designed and built himself, known as CADZilla.

“It’s just about getting people’s attention to the whole waste problem…it’s not just the fact that we’re using all these single-use plastics, it’s everything else we’re using as well” , Mr. Rosewell said.

“Steve assumes after looking at a RAT test himself, that it will be fine to put them in his machine, intact with the strips inside, but that’s something we’ll have to prove,” Ms Mainsbridge said.

“It creates a pretty big barrier if it fails. It can still be done, but it just adds another step to the process.

“COVID-19 has forced the world to address the gaps and overlooked aspects of the waste stream” – Dr Maria Neira, Director of the Department of Public Health and Environment, WHO

WHO Director of the Department of Public Health and Environment, Dr Maria Neira, said: “COVID-19 has forced the world to address the gaps and overlooked aspects of the waste stream and how we produce, use and dispose of our healthcare resources, from cradle to grave.

Tens of thousands of tons of additional medical waste resulting from the response to the COVID-19 pandemic have strained medical waste management systems around the world, according to a new report from the World Health Organization.

“What we are doing is just a demonstration, our organization is not trying to become a recycling company,” Ms Mainsbridge said, hoping for national reform.

“People are nervous”

The WHO report says the additional waste produced during the pandemic threatens human and environmental health and reveals an urgent need to improve waste management practices.

Printer cartridge and sanitary waste disposal processes are a good place to start looking for possible solutions, says Ms. Mainsbridge.

“What’s really important with these systems is that they are collected by trained people, so any risks can be easily managed.”

Ms Mainsbridge says staff trained in waste disposal would be key to the national RAT recycling scheme.
Ms Mainsbridge says staff trained in waste disposal would be key to the national RAT recycling scheme. Credit: DANIEL POCKET/AAP picture

Asked how she was tracking the recycling pilot and test collection, Ms Mainsbridge said: ‘That’s the tricky part. People are nervous, people are really nervous.”

With only a few pounds in her collection so far, Sasha approaches operating stores which she thinks might be ready to have collection bins, but says, “There is a lot of concern around the biohazard element. The challenge at the moment is to make it more convenient for people to drop them off.

“We advocate for extended producer responsibility in the form of a collection bin program where every place you buy a RAT has a collection bin,” Ms Mainsbridge wrote on her website.

“Why shouldn’t it be the responsibility of the manufacturer and the seller to manage end-of-life materials? »

“People are nervous, people are really nervous” – Sasha Mainsbridge, founder of Mullum Cares

Currently, Ms Mainsbridge says she decontaminates hand-delivered RATs using the COVID wash station at her organization, submerging the kits in sterilization solution for three days.

Likewise, Mr. Rosewell isn’t overly concerned that the project involves the processing of biohazardous materials.

He says he would be equally nervous to deal with general waste due to the large number of people unaware they are living with COVID, normally throwing away contaminated food waste and single-use drink bottles.

“The actual number of cases in the community is likely much higher than what is being reported,” Queensland Health Minister Yvette D’Ath said of a first of its kind. ranomized COVID test study.

This study sampled 117 households and found that while 20 households tested positive, only two of them already knew they were positive.

“Pool” of chemical waste

The WHO indicates that from 140 million test kits, it is possible to generate 2,600 tons of non-infectious waste, mainly plastic, and 731,000 liters of chemical waste, which is equivalent to a third of a swimming pool. Olympic size. .

Their report calls for reform and investmentwith recommendations including support for centralized treatment and investment in the recycling sector to ensure that materials like plastics can have a second life.

A warehouse full of rapid antigen tests.
A warehouse full of rapid antigen tests. Credit: Scott Dalton/PA

“In the face of COVID-19, the sustainable management of healthcare waste is more important than ever to protect communities, healthcare workers and the planet and to prevent pollution,” said Ruth Stringer, science and policy coordinator of Health Care Without Harm.

A WHO statement says the COVID-19 waste challenge presents an opportunity to strengthen systems to safely and sustainably reduce and manage healthcare waste.

“This can come through strong national policies and regulations, regular monitoring and reporting and increased accountability, support for behavior change and workforce development, and increased budgets and funding .

“Systemic change in the way healthcare manages its waste would include more thorough and systematic review and better procurement practices,” said healthcare waste task force chair Dr. Anne Woolridge.

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Artist Channels ‘Nature’s Fury’ Against Environmental Destruction & Broken Promises https://balibs.org/artist-channels-natures-fury-against-environmental-destruction-broken-promises/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 08:01:31 +0000 https://balibs.org/artist-channels-natures-fury-against-environmental-destruction-broken-promises/ A. Kurniawan Ulung (Jakarta Post) Jakarta ● Mon 7 February 2022 2022-02-07 15:00 1 22dc95a23fb944820adae5904f20a96b 1 Art & Culture performance-art, fine-arts, indonesian-artists, arahmaiani, environment, environmental-damage, environmental-issues, environmental-commitments To free The Bandung Arahmaiani-born artist is known for using her art and activism to fight for the environment, as well as helping local communities apply traditional methods […]]]>

A. Kurniawan Ulung (Jakarta Post)

Jakarta ●
Mon 7 February 2022

2022-02-07
15:00
1
22dc95a23fb944820adae5904f20a96b
1
Art & Culture
performance-art, fine-arts, indonesian-artists, arahmaiani, environment, environmental-damage, environmental-issues, environmental-commitments
To free

The Bandung Arahmaiani-born artist is known for using her art and activism to fight for the environment, as well as helping local communities apply traditional methods and wisdoms to develop sustainable farms.

Reflecting on today’s environmental perils, renowned artist and environmental activist Arahmaiani persists in her criticism of the government for its lack of action to protect and preserve the environment.

She turned her fury into a performance art called furious mother earth.

The performance begins with Arahmaiani writing the word “Okay(nature) in all caps on a white wall as his audience sits next to a table covered in balls of clay. After she finishes writing, she picks up some of the clay balls and throws them against the wall. She then asks the audience to stand up and throw the balls until the wall is splattered with clay.

Guilty by association: People throw clay balls at a wall bearing the word ‘alam’ in a depiction of Arahmaiani’s interactive performance art, ‘Furious Mother Earth’. (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung) (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung)

The 20-minute performance art is Arahmaiani’s way of visualizing that nature is sick because of humans constantly harming it.

The 60-year-old artist blames humans for many “natural” disasters, including the COVID-19 pandemic.

“This pandemic is a sign from nature to all of us that we need to change our mindset and our way of life to stop ourselves from causing more destruction on this planet,” she said.

Government Spokesperson

On the national art scene, Arahmaiani is known for using her art to critique religious intolerance and radicalism, as well as calling for interreligious dialogue and peace. However, his recent work primarily explores the relationship between nature and human activity that has led to environmental problems.

She used “furious” in the title of her latest performance, she says, to “convey the message that Mother Earth is furious with us and we will suffer if we are not careful in our behavior towards nature”.

Before the pandemic, Arahmaiani was inspired by President Joko Widodo’s campaign promise to save the environment, which she says was not delivered. So she created a piece called shadow of the pastthat she performed at the Taman Prasasti Museum in central Jakarta, kissing trees while strolling through the museum grounds, her face and hair covered in clay.

Arahmaiani often uses clay symbolically, as its basic components, soil and water, are the sources of all life.

Empty future: Arahmaiani, face and head covered in clay, performs Empty future: Arahmaiani, face and head covered in clay, performs “Shadow of the Past” at Museum Taman Prasasti before the pandemic. The article is a social commentary on President Joko Widodo’s broken campaign promise to protect the environment. (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung) (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung)

Beyond Art

Arahmaiani used to travel back and forth between Indonesia and Tibet, working with the monks there to start a tree-planting project while also working on his art projects.

Since the arrival of the pandemic and the resulting travel restrictions, she has focused on developing organic farms in Bali and Yogyakarta.

In Yogyakarta, she teamed up with santri (Islamic boarding schools) from Pondok Pesantren Amumarta in Bantul Regency as well as residents and farmers from the Bumi Langit community, also in Bantul.

In Bali, she worked on various conversation projects in collaboration with the Sanggar Paripurna community of Bona village in Gianyar and the Kebun Berdaya community of Tegeh Sari village in Denpasar. Organic farms designed by these communities have inspired others in nearby Balinese villages to follow suit.

“The community-developed organic farms in Bona are designed for rural dwellers, while the community-developed organic farms in Denpasar are designed for urban dwellers,” she explained.

Arahmaiani and communities have used permaculture to develop sustainable and self-sufficient agricultural ecosystems in alignment with local customs and wisdoms.

Permaculture embraces the natural arrangements of thriving ecosystems in the design of productive and self-sufficient human habitats, and is a movement founded by Australian researcher Bill Mollison.

According to Arahmaiani, however, ancestral Indonesians were practicing the technique long before Mollison coined the term in 1978.

“In the past, people saw themselves as part of nature, not as the ruler of nature. That’s why they had a harmonious relationship with nature. In contrast, people in the modern era tend to be destructive Forests are cleared and natural resources such as oil and coal are [taken] for money,” she said.

Ecological Balance: Arahmaiani's art since the pandemic has focused on the imbalanced and disharmonious relationship between nature and human beings which she believes is the root cause of natural disasters, including COVID-19.  (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung)  Ecological Balance: Arahmaiani’s art since the pandemic has focused on the imbalanced and disharmonious relationship between nature and human beings which she believes is the root cause of natural disasters, including COVID-19. (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung) (JP/A. Kurniawan Ulung)

Beneficial to all

Balinese puppeteer I Made Sidia, who is also artistic director of the Sanggar Paripurna arts center in Gianyar, expressed his gratitude to Arahmaiani for helping his students better understand nature and love local traditions through his art.

He recalled Arahmaiani once performing one of his famous pieces, flag projectat Sanggar Paripurna and inviting his students to dance during the performance.

“This performance taught us to be open-minded, to love our nation’s noble values, and most importantly, to care for the environment and fellow human beings,” Made said.

He also said Arahmaiani taught his students to grow vegetables and fruits using organic methods, dividing them into gardening groups with agriculture-inspired names like Kambing (Goat), Sapi (Cow), Anjing (Dog) and Ayam (Chicken) for a gardening contest at the arts center.

The competition helped students understand the benefits of organic foods and the dangers of pesticides to the human body, Made said.

“They don’t litter now. Before meeting Arahmaiani, they had no discipline to properly dispose of garbage, especially plastic waste. environment,” he said.

Krisna Waworuntu, who runs an organic farm within the Bumi Langit community, said he was grateful to collaborate with Arahmaiani.

“Our collaboration is not too artistic but functional, because I want its benefits to be sustainable for society and the environment,” he said.


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Do condoms correspond to Indonesian culture? https://balibs.org/do-condoms-correspond-to-indonesian-culture/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/do-condoms-correspond-to-indonesian-culture/ While many Asia-Pacific countries have made progress in the fight against AIDS, the number of cases in Indonesia is on the rise, thanks in part to politicians pandering to religious conservatives who preach against condoms. This problem is not new. When I arrived in Indonesia in 1996, the country seemed to deny the risk of […]]]>

While many Asia-Pacific countries have made progress in the fight against AIDS, the number of cases in Indonesia is on the rise, thanks in part to politicians pandering to religious conservatives who preach against condoms.

This problem is not new. When I arrived in Indonesia in 1996, the country seemed to deny the risk of AIDS. At that time, there were officially only 390 cases of HIV, although the University of Indonesia estimates that at least 12,000 Indonesians died of AIDS each year.

I remember in 1996 the Minister of Health, Achmad Sujudi, said that the government would not promote the use of condoms to fight the spread of AIDS because it was not culturally appropriate . “The most appropriate method for us is counseling and not distributing condoms,” he said. This prompted me – while working as a sub-editor of a newspaper – to come up with the headline: “Minister Says Condoms Don’t Fit Indonesian Culture. It’s depressing that more than 25 years later, in Indonesia, I can recycle a variation of this old title.

Indonesia finally got more serious about the fight against HIV/AIDS, launching a national movement against the virus in 2002. But there has always been opposition from conservative Muslim groups, who claim that condom promotion encourages young people to have casual sex.

When a public service advertisement promoting condom use was shown on Indonesian television stations in 2002, conservatives, such as the Indonesian Mujahideen Council, complained. They felt the ad was pornographic and endorsed the promiscuity. The government responded by pulling the ad.

This tendency to give in to pressure has continued. In 2013, the Ministry of Health gave in to protests by extremist Muslim groups by canceling National Condom Week, a program aimed at raising awareness of sexually transmitted diseases. Parliament even summoned the Minister of Health to demand to know why condoms were distributed to high-risk groups, such as prostitutes.

At the end of 2009, approximately 333,200 people in Indonesia were living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. By 2020, the number had risen to 540,000. According to data from UNAIDS and the World Health Organization, the number of people dying from HIV-related causes in Indonesia increased by 102% between 2010 and 2020. In neighboring Malaysia, the number of HIV-related deaths had fallen by 42% during the same period. decade, while there was a 38 percent decline in Papua New Guinea.

Do condoms correspond to Indonesian culture?

Outrageous shame

In Indonesian tabloids, the word condom denotes scandal and shame. Recent headlines include: “Police Raid Shared House, Netting Same-Sex Couples and Used Condoms”, “Riau Police Find Condoms and Pills”, “Pervert Nabbed in Ambon, Officer Finds Condoms” and “Selebgram Serves Guest at Hotel , 6 used condoms found.

Opposition to condoms has gone hand in hand with the rise of the culture of homophobia in Indonesia. Some radical groups say the best way to fight AIDS is to make Indonesia an Islamic state so that homosexuality can be banned.

HIV is most prevalent in Indonesia among injecting drug users, particularly in prisons, where corruption means drugs are widely available. About 35% of people living with HIV in Indonesia are women. The latest statistics indicate that approximately 68% of prostitutes in the country use condoms.

An estimated 190 million condoms are sold in Indonesia every year, but manufacturers and health experts say public awareness and acceptance of condoms is not high enough.

condoms indonesia

Rubber

Indonesia’s sensitivity to condoms is perhaps ironic, given that the country is the world’s second largest producer of rubber. Indonesia has a condom factory, run by a state-owned company called Mitra Rajawali Banjaran, which produces Artika-branded condoms. These come in packets depicting a crocodile with open jaws, reinforcing the sexist notion that sex is a predatory act. The vast majority of condoms sold in Indonesia are imported brands, such as Fiesta and Sutra (both made by DKT) and Durex (made in Malaysia).

Anti-condom sentiment is so bad in Indonesia that some international development organizations have had to water down or modify health projects that incorporated the promotion of safer sex for fear of having their permits revoked by the Ministry of Interior.

Nonetheless, condom advertisements still air on some TV channels late at night and attempt to be kept within the bounds of Indonesian decency. These ads invariably suggest that condoms give married men sexual stamina, rather than explicitly explaining that they stop unwanted pregnancies and disease.

condoms in indonesia

Double standards

Where are the pious Indonesian anti-condom brigades when religious teachers rape young female students? Consider the case of Herry Wiryawan, 36, a teacher at an Islamic boarding school in West Java, currently on trial for raping at least 13 female students between the ages of 13 and 16. These rapes would have resulted in up to eight births.

Such cases are not uncommon. In July 2021, a fifty-year-old Islamic boarding school teacher named Subechan was sentenced to 15 years in prison for raping some of his students. He had told them that sex was a noble religious act that would bring good fortune.

In December 2021, a Quran teacher in Depok, West Java was arrested for the alleged sexual abuse of 10 of his students, most of them 10 years old. There have been other cases of students being raped and then encouraged to marry the rapist.

Sex crimes happen in all religions. In January 2021, Syahril Parlindungan Marbun, a church administrator in Depok, was sentenced to 15 years in prison for sexually assaulting 20 young altar boys.

Is it the availability of condoms that drives religious figures to rape children? Of course not, but complaints against condom sales continue, especially as Valentine’s Day approaches. In recent years, public order police in different cities have warned convenience stores not to sell condoms to single people. Moral vigilante groups have also threatened to take action to stop condom sales.

condom indonesia“Condoms are not cool”

Decades of conservative opposition to condoms seem to be working. I recently spoke to young Indonesians, who told me that condoms are not cool. They explained that condoms are not considered macho because they look unnatural and because there is a social stigma attached to their purchase. They also said that sexually active girls are unlikely to be on birth control because they are too embarrassed or unable to buy birth control pills.

So, does the taboo against condoms prevent Indonesian teenagers from experimenting with sex? Short answer: no. Some teens may just be braggarts, claiming they like sex without a condom and pull out before ejaculation to avoid pregnancy. However, the Ministry of Women Empowerment and Child Welfare has reported a significant increase in the rate of child marriages during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially among low income and low income communities. of education. The main factor behind these marriages is pregnancy, as families do not want a girl to become a single mother. When girls have to drop out of school due to an unplanned pregnancy, they are more likely to remain trapped in a cycle of poverty.

It is up to parents, schools and the government to teach children about reproductive health, but this should not include the stigma of safer sex.

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Indonesian lion dance contributes greatly to sports tourism: KONI https://balibs.org/indonesian-lion-dance-contributes-greatly-to-sports-tourism-koni/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/indonesian-lion-dance-contributes-greatly-to-sports-tourism-koni/ I am grateful that the lion dance has been included as a sports branch Jakarta (ANTARA) – The Lion Dance Show, or barongsai, contributes enormously to boosting the country’s sports tourism, the chairman of the National Sports Committee (KONI), Marciano Norman, said on Friday. Norman suggested to the leadership of the Board of Directors of […]]]>

I am grateful that the lion dance has been included as a sports branch

Jakarta (ANTARA) – The Lion Dance Show, or barongsai, contributes enormously to boosting the country’s sports tourism, the chairman of the National Sports Committee (KONI), Marciano Norman, said on Friday.

Norman suggested to the leadership of the Board of Directors of the Indonesian Lion Dance Federation (PB FOBI) to organize events regularly to produce great lion dance athletes. He also advised PB FOBI to collaborate in improving the governance of the organization.

The barongsai, or lion dance, has a special value that supports the development of Indonesian sports tourism, he said. Therefore, he affirmed that some special events in synergy with regional programs should be organized.

Earlier, KONI welcomed the visit of PB FOBI officers to Senayan, Jakarta on Wednesday, January 19, 2022.

During the meeting, PB FOBI President Edy Kusuma spoke about the lion dance training programs still going on amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

“During the pandemic, FOBI has never halted its operations across Indonesia,” he added.

Related News: Donggala will be a national attraction after state capital transfer

Currently, Kusuma noted that PB FOBI encompasses 25 provincial directorates across Indonesia. Representing members of society who perform and enjoy the Indonesian lion dance, he expressed his gratitude that the lion dance is not just a form of entertainment.

“I am grateful that the lion dance has been included as a branch of sport,” he said.

PB FOBI also noted that some Indonesian lion dance athletes have participated in several international championships.

Besides the commendable lion dance athletes, the judging process of lion dance competitions in Indonesia was smooth as Indonesia always aims for international regulations.

Related news: Indonesia focuses on upskilling tourism professionals: Uno

The board leadership of the Indonesian Lion Dance Federation has also released a translated book of international regulations as a guideline for lion dance sports in the country. Several countries have taken inspiration from Indonesia as a judge due to which PB FOBI has planned to hold a related seminar in 2022.

PB FOBI is also optimistic that the lion dance would be competed in the National Sports Week (PON) in the future, as the sport has become embedded in Indonesian culture for a long time.

“The story of barongsai) dates back to ancient times in Indonesia. Artists have expanded to more than people of Chinese descent,” he noted.

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Dragon Dance rehearsal intensifies ahead of Imlek https://balibs.org/dragon-dance-rehearsal-intensifies-ahead-of-imlek/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/dragon-dance-rehearsal-intensifies-ahead-of-imlek/ Bogor. A group of dancers specializing in the traditional dragon dance have stepped up their training sessions ahead of the Chinese New Year or many people here call Imlek. The group, which calls itself Barongsai Naga Merah Putih, is based in Bogor, a suburb of Jakarta. The practice took place inside an abandoned leather factory […]]]>

Bogor. A group of dancers specializing in the traditional dragon dance have stepped up their training sessions ahead of the Chinese New Year or many people here call Imlek.

The group, which calls itself Barongsai Naga Merah Putih, is based in Bogor, a suburb of Jakarta. The practice took place inside an abandoned leather factory on the bank of the Ciliwung River.

They are gearing up for the most anticipated annual cultural tradition for ethnic Chinese Indonesians and residents of Bogor. This is all the more the case since the Covid-19 pandemic put it on hold for almost two years.

There are 50 staff members joining the club from different cultural and religious backgrounds. During the practice, each person should show tolerance towards others. For example, they must stop the practice during the Muslim call to prayer.

January and February are the busiest months for artists. They have to practice every day because there will be a lot of work, usually up to 20 performances in offices or malls in Bogor region only.

Dancers warm up during the Dragon Dance practice season in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Dancers prepare to practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java on January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Members of the Naga Merah Putih dragon dance group prepare to practice in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

A man plays a small cymbal during practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A man plays a small cymbal during a dragon dance practice session in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Dancers perform a Liong (dragon dance) during a practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dancers manipulate a dragon puppet using poles in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Dancers perform a Liong (dragon) dance during a practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A team of skilled dancers demonstrate the corkscrew motion of a dragon puppet using poles in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Dancers perform a Liong (dragon dance) during a practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dancers move a long, flexible dragon puppet during a practice session in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Dancers perform a Liong (dragon dance) during a practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dancers use poles to move a giant long dragon puppet in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

A Liong silhouette is seen during training at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
A silhouette of a dragon puppet’s head is seen during a practice session in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

Dancers pose with the Liong during a practice at the Naga Merah Putih headquarters in Bogor, West Java, January 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)
Dancers pose for a photo with the dragon puppet in Bogor, West Java, Jan. 15, 2022. (JG Photo/Yudha Baskoro)

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Dance and music return to Bali, but not foreign tourists https://balibs.org/dance-and-music-return-to-bali-but-not-foreign-tourists/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 20:28:24 +0000 https://balibs.org/dance-and-music-return-to-bali-but-not-foreign-tourists/ [ad_1] Sir David Attenborough calls again to save plant life with BBC TV series ‘The Green Planet’ BOGOTA: Rising over 250 feet above the forest floor, California redwoods are the largest living things on the planet. It is at the foot of one of these 3,000-year-old giants that English broadcaster and nature historian Sir David […]]]>


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Sir David Attenborough calls again to save plant life with BBC TV series ‘The Green Planet’

BOGOTA: Rising over 250 feet above the forest floor, California redwoods are the largest living things on the planet.

It is at the foot of one of these 3,000-year-old giants that English broadcaster and nature historian Sir David Attenborough opens his new series, “The Green Planet”, which will air in the Middle East on beIN at from January 1st. ten.

“Plants, whether huge like this or microscopic, are the basis of all life, including ourselves,” the 95-year-old broadcaster said in the opening minutes of the first episode, titled “Tropical.”

“We depend on them for every bite of the food we eat and every breath of air we breathe,” he continues. “The plants are thriving in a remarkable way. Yet, for the most part, the secrets of their world have been kept from us. Until now.”

The BBC’s five-part production claims to offer a fresh take on the extraordinary world of plants. To do this, he would have used an array of pioneering technologies, from robotic platforms and drone cameras to time-lapse photography on the move, to ultra-detailed thermal cameras, to the stacking of deep focus macro images, to ultra-fast photography and the latest in microscopy.

The result is a series that turns the seemingly static world of trees and plants into a dynamic journey through a parallel universe in which plants are as aggressive, competitive and dramatic as wild animals, locked in a death struggle for food. , light and procreation.

Footage in the opening episode features time-lapse footage of leaf-cutting ants tearing down succulent leaves growing on a branch and carrying them to their underground lair, where a giant mushroom waits to feast on the mulch. The ants are rewarded for their efforts by the fungus with a constant supply of small mushrooms.

The footage illustrating this strange symbiosis was filmed over a three-week span deep in the Costa Rican rainforest, where cameramen struggled with their heavy equipment through dense jungle, braving episodes of torrential rain.

Sir David speaking at an event to kick off the United Nations climate change conference, COP26, in central London in February 2020 (AFP / File Photo)

According to the producers, the weather was not the only challenge they had to overcome. A crew filming footage in Borneo, for example, had to face their fair share of adversity after accidentally disturbing a nest of giant Asian hornets, causing nasty stings.

Later in the series, Sir David himself fell ill with a particularly thorny cactus known as cholla. Even though he was wearing a Kevlar liner with a welding glove on top, the plant’s dense rosette of thorns was able to pierce through the protection.

In another scene from Episode 1, viewers encounter a species of bat that, like ants and their friendly fungus, exists in perfect symbiosis with a night-blooming flower. It offers small mammals exclusive dives on its precious nectar in return for their services as chief pollinators.

Viewers also discover a rather repulsive-looking three-foot-wide parasitic plant known as the Corpse Flower, which mimics both the look and stench of rotting meat – with fur. and teeth – to attract pollinating flies.

Behind the scenes. Camera operator Oliver Mueller uses a specially designed robotic camera system known as the Triffid to film the Corpse Flower (Rafflesia keithii), Borneo. (Provided / BBC)

Covering 27 countries and produced over a period of four years, “The Green Planet” claims to offer the first comprehensive glimpse into the world of plants since the broadcast of Sir David’s previous series, “The Privacy of Plants”, 26 years ago. year.

“In ‘Private Life of Plants’ we were stuck with all this very heavy, primitive gear, but now we can take the cameras anywhere we want,” Sir David said in a recent interview.

“So now you have the option of going into a real forest, you can see a plant grow with its neighbors, fight with its neighbors, or move with its neighbors or die. And that’s, in my opinion, what brings it to life and what should make people say, ‘God damn it, these amazing organisms are like us.’ “

Over the course of the series, Sir David has traveled across the United States, Costa Rica, Croatia and northern Europe, from deserts to mountains, from rainforests to the frozen north, to create a new understanding of how plants live, experience the seasons and interact. with the animal world, including humanity.

Behind the scenes. Team doctor Dr Patrick Avery on a canopy tram in Costa Rica with Sir David and drone pilot Louis Rummer-Downing. Patrick has just launched a drone carrying a camera, which will film David’s journey through the canopy. (Provided / BBC)

The timing of the release of ‘The Green Planet’ could not be more critical, as many of the world’s ecosystems appear to be on the verge of collapse, with climate change, deforestation and pollution causing more and more weather events. extremes and loss of valuable biodiversity.

In the Middle East, for example, where temperatures regularly exceed 40 ° C for several months of the year, experts warn that climate change could soon make parts of the region uninhabitable for humans.

In response to the looming challenge, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have launched renewable energy initiatives, adopting green fuels such as wind, solar and hydrogen power. The two countries also enthusiastically participated in COP26, the United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Glasgow, Scotland, in November.

The previous month, Saudi Arabia launched its Saudi Green and Middle East Green initiatives, committing the Kingdom to achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2060 and to plant 10 billion trees over the next decades. , rehabilitating 8 million hectares of degraded land and creating new protected areas.

In the wings. Sir David standing among the giant sequoias, Sequoiadendron giganteum, the tallest trees in the world. California, United States. (Provided / BBC)

Sir David addressed world leaders at COP26 to stress the need to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prevent global temperatures from rising above 1.5 C above pre-industrial levels.

“Maybe the fact that the people most affected by climate change are no longer imaginary future generations but young people alive today… delegates.

“Our burning of fossil fuels, our destruction of nature, our approach to industry, construction and learning are releasing carbon into the atmosphere at an unprecedented rate and scale. We are already in trouble. The stability on which we all depend is being shattered.

Sir David should know. In a career spanning nearly seven decades, in which he has presented some of the most memorable nature documentaries ever made, he has witnessed this gradual destruction.

Clockwise from bottom: The Khasi family uses a living root bridge. Meghalaya, India; Saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), Sonoran Desert, Arizona. A mature saguaro can store 5,000 liters of water; and winter in the boreal forests of Finland. Spruce, pine and birch dominate this landscape. (Provided / BBC)

In 1937, when he was 11 years old, the world population was 2.3 billion and the amount of carbon in the atmosphere was 280 parts per million. Today, there are nearly 7.8 billion people on the planet, and the level of carbon in the atmosphere is around 415 parts per million.

Sir David joined the BBC in 1952 as an intern producer. While working on a series called “Zoo Quest”, between 1954 and 1964 he had his first opportunity to visit remote corners of the globe and capture images of wildlife in its natural habitats.

He left the cinema in 1965 to become the Controller of BBC2, a period during which he helped introduce color television to the UK, before becoming Program Director of BBC Television.

But in 1973, he decided to leave the administrative side of television and return to making documentaries.

Clockwise from L: A giant sequoia, Sequoiadendron giganteum, the tallest trees on Earth; the flowers of the “7 o’clock flower”, Merinthopodium neuranthom, are pollinated by the Underwood long-tongue bat (Hylonycteris underwoodi); and the giant water lily, species Victoria, in the Pantanal region of Brazil. (Supplied / BBC / Paul Williams)

He quickly established himself as Britain’s best-known natural history programmer, presenting “Life on Earth” in 1979 and “The Blue Planet” in 2001.

It is thanks to this cinema life, and of course his sweet and instantly recognizable storytelling, that Sir David is now at the forefront of issues related to the conservation and decline of the planet’s species – and is regarded as a treasure trove. British national.

“The world suddenly became aware of plants,” he said recently. “There was a revolution around the world in attitudes towards the natural world during my lifetime. Awakening and awareness of the importance of the natural world to all of us. A realization that we would starve without plants, we would not be able to breathe without plants.

Sir David believes the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting lockdowns have encouraged people to pay more attention to the plant life around them.

Sir David is now at the forefront of issues relating to the conservation and decline of the planet’s species – and is considered a UK national treasure. (AFP / File Photos)

“I think that being locked up and confined in your garden, if you are lucky enough to have a garden – and if not, to have plants on a shelf – has changed the way people look and the consciousness of a another world that exists that we hardly ever pay attention to, ”he said.

So what does he hope the public will take away from “The Green Planet”?

“That there is a parallel world on which we depend and which, until now, we have largely ignored, if I speak for the urbanized man,” he said.

“More than half of the world’s population, according to the UN, is urbanized, lives in cities, sees only cultivated plants and never sees a community of wild plants.

“But this wild community is there, outside of normal urban circumstances, and we depend on it. And we better take good care of it.

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John Cleese accuses BBC of ‘misleading’ and ‘dishonest’ interview on cancel culture | United Kingdom | News https://balibs.org/john-cleese-accuses-bbc-of-misleading-and-dishonest-interview-on-cancel-culture-united-kingdom-news/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/john-cleese-accuses-bbc-of-misleading-and-dishonest-interview-on-cancel-culture-united-kingdom-news/ The Monty Python star said he was filing a formal complaint about the interview, saying the interviewer tried to portray him in a “dishonest” way. He said he was described as “old-fashioned, indifferent and basically harmful”. He also claimed that the interviewer did not discuss agreed upon topics. Criticizing the broadcaster on Twitter, the 82-year-old […]]]>

The Monty Python star said he was filing a formal complaint about the interview, saying the interviewer tried to portray him in a “dishonest” way. He said he was described as “old-fashioned, indifferent and basically harmful”.

He also claimed that the interviewer did not discuss agreed upon topics.

Criticizing the broadcaster on Twitter, the 82-year-old actor said: “Just did an interview with BBC World Asia.

“It was to talk about the shows I do in Singapore and Bangkok.

“Instead, the interviewer, whose name I believe was Karishma, started by asking me about Cancel Culture.

“I responded courteously and fully explained that if parents were overprotective, it did not prepare children well for their entry into the real and often not very pleasant world.

“She then asked a rambling question, clearly trying to portray me as old-fashioned, indifferent and basically harmful.”

He said his answer to the question was then “totally ignored” by the interviewer, who then asked him about Dave Chapelle and the Covid-19 pandemic.

Mr. Cleese then asked to stop the interview.

READ MORE: John Cleese pokes fun at woke culture by joking about microaggression

“She only wanted the role of prosecutor.

“The BBC needs to train her again.

“The media will no doubt report that I ‘stormed out’. I didn’t and I didn’t lose my temper either.

“But I was depressed that this kind of presenter cr** ego was so prevalent now.”

It comes after the comedian and actor ‘blacklisted’ himself from the Cambridge Union Debating Society last month after a historian who posed as Adolf Hitler during a debate of society was banned.

Mr Cleese, who was due to address the union in November, said he made a similar impression on his ‘Monty Python’ sketch show and made the decision to pull out of the event ‘before anyone another does”.

He suggested another venue be planned for the event “where revival rules do not apply” and apologized to union members who had been eagerly awaiting his speech.

Responding to Mr Cleese’s allegations, a BBC spokesperson said: “It was a fair and appropriate interview which touched on topics John Cleese has spoken about before as well as themes within his new tour.

“Our presenter is an excellent, experienced journalist who conducted the interview entirely within our editorial guidelines.”

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2021 Jeonju Kimchi Culture Festival Held in Taste City https://balibs.org/2021-jeonju-kimchi-culture-festival-held-in-taste-city/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/2021-jeonju-kimchi-culture-festival-held-in-taste-city/ Jeonju, South Korea–(ANTARA/Business Wire)- A festival where attendees can learn how to make kimchi has opened in Jeonju, the City of Taste. Jeonju City has announced that the 2021 Jeonju Kimchi Culture Festival, an event organized by Jeonju Food Integrated Support Center, will be held online and throughout the city, including Jeonju Stadium from November […]]]>

Jeonju, South Korea–(ANTARA/Business Wire)- A festival where attendees can learn how to make kimchi has opened in Jeonju, the City of Taste.

Jeonju City has announced that the 2021 Jeonju Kimchi Culture Festival, an event organized by Jeonju Food Integrated Support Center, will be held online and throughout the city, including Jeonju Stadium from November 2 to 30.

Held for the third time this year, the Jeonju Kimchi Culture Festival is held in different locations at different times given the COVID-19 situation. While last year’s festival offered the Kimchi (Kimjang) Making Experience Program only as a Drive-Thru event, it is being held as both a Drive-Thru and an on-site event this year.

The festival offers 12 programs, including kimchi making, kimchi sharing, a kimchi culture tour, and other specialized programs.

The Kimjang Experience, the main program, takes place as a Drive-Thru event on November 19 with 450 family unit participants. The 20 and 21, 150 families, in groups of 25 families per session, experience Kimchi making at Jeonju Stadium. In addition, the Kimjang experience for multicultural families and international students is offered at the Jeonju Kimchi Cultural Center and at each university.

On the 19th and 20th, the Kimchi sharing event takes place. Organizations and groups in Jeonju donate Kimchi to the neglected class. The program also includes a “Kimchi Sharing with Story” event where participants can send Kimchi to people they want to express their gratitude to or neighbors in need.

The two-day cultural tour of Kimchi includes the “Kimjang Experience for Tourists” program, which helps tourists enjoy Kimchi along with cultural tourism, as well as “‘Delicious Kimchi School’ and a program to make 1 kg of Special Kimchi through which attendees can try making a range of Kimchi using products from the local Jeonju farm.

A variety of other exciting programs are also available, including the Kimchi contest targeting 20 families, a grain threshing experience and photo zones.

Cabbage used during the festival period is sourced from Jeonju Farms and salted in HACCP-certified facilities. As for seasoning ingredients, such as red pepper and radish, only those that have passed the safety test for agricultural products are used. After the festival, leftover cabbage and seasoning ingredients will be sold at the Kimchi Street Farmers’ Market, which will open Nov. 25-27 at the Jeonju Food store.

An official from the Jeonju Agricultural Technology Center said, “Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the excellence of kimchi on human health has been verified around the world. As much as possible, we have prepared this festival to help attendees discover and experience Korean traditional culture of kimchi making, which has been listed as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

contacts

JEONJU CITY

Inuk Hwang

+82-63-281-2226

Source: JEONJU CITY

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The Abandonment of Automobile Culture Leads to a Greener Future | Opinion https://balibs.org/the-abandonment-of-automobile-culture-leads-to-a-greener-future-opinion/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/the-abandonment-of-automobile-culture-leads-to-a-greener-future-opinion/ [ad_1] (Camila Vallejo / Daily Titan) The Earth is warming because gigantic amounts of greenhouse gases continue to be released into the atmosphere each year. Subsequently, frequent and intense forest fires have broken out across the state, some becoming so large they can be seen from space. Of the four main types of greenhouse gases, […]]]>


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(Camila Vallejo / Daily Titan)


The Earth is warming because gigantic amounts of greenhouse gases continue to be released into the atmosphere each year. Subsequently, frequent and intense forest fires have broken out across the state, some becoming so large they can be seen from space.

Of the four main types of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide or CO2, emissions must be controlled because they represent 80% of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency . Of these 80%, transport rejects 35% of the CO2 emissions of this sector in 2019.

According to the World Resources Institute, California emitted the second highest amount of greenhouse gases in 2018, behind Texas, and about 49% of that comes from transportation.

Carbon dioxide emissions must be reduced, and there are many feasible options that Cal State Fullerton and the transportation departments can consider to reduce transportation’s carbon footprint.

Using public transportation, such as a bus, can dramatically reduce the number of cars on the road. A bus usually has a capacity of at least 36 people. A single bus carrying several people emits less pollution than 36 people driving their cars separately.

Although public transport is strongly promoted as a means of reducing transport costs, it might not be reliable. Ultimately, people choose convenience over conscience. Bus schedules are in limbo due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Before that, they would arrive every half hour when they should be running at 15 minute frequencies. Despite their inconsistent schedules, buses drastically reduce the number of people driving single vehicles on the road. Ultimately, more fuel is conserved and the carbon footprint decreases.

The Orange County Transportation Authority should paint reserved bus lanes on Orange County’s most congested highways, such as Katella Ave., State College, Harbor and Beach boulevards, so that buses have their own right of way at instead of being mixed up and slowed down with traffic.

Better yet, for routes with dedicated bus lanes, the buses should have signal priority, where a lamppost stays lit green for oncoming buses.

Like public transport, cities need to develop better cycling infrastructure, such as wider cycle lanes with physical barriers for cyclists and other cars on the road. This would encourage more people to ride a bicycle, as it would be as safe and convenient as driving a car.

The benefits of traveling by public transit or by bicycle are not only a lower carbon footprint, but also lower parking and gasoline costs.

The CSUF should offer discounted bus passes instead of overpricing them for a $ 100 semester pass or exchange scheme for students who have purchased a $ 334 parking permit so that they can exchange it for a one-year pass.

Many people still don’t see the value of public transport or cycling. With the rise of Tesla automobiles, the perfect solution seems to be more electric vehicles. However, this is not the case.

Even if the car does not emit CO2 while driving, it still needs to be recharged from an electric vehicle charging station, which is powered by the grid, which is mainly powered by fossil fuels. The focus should be on reducing the mass of cars on the road before moving on to mass consumption of electric vehicles.

Even humanity’s best efforts to improve transportation will not be enough until the United States engages in suburban sprawl. Cities should also build dense mixed-use housing around public transport stops. Mixed-use development is where housing and commercial businesses share buildings. A close example of this concept is University Hall. Restaurants are located within walking or cycling distance of the building.

This is a concept known as transit-oriented development, and its goal is to have everyone’s basic needs in one place or at least have them within reach of a service. of public transport.

The development focused on public transport allows people who live in these areas to reach their destinations in a few minutes on foot, without spitting pollutants from their cars into the air.

USC Village, for example, is home to housing for 2,500 undergraduates with a Target and Trader Joe’s, among other restaurants, nearby for student access and two light rail stops, on Jefferson and Exposition Boulevard.

Another effort by Cal State Fullerton to make the campus more accessible on foot is its plans to build a pedestrian bridge over Nutwood Avenue, which stems from complaints from several people about the lack of safety around this corner.

Ultimately, it is the responsibility of government officials to transform cities into easily accessible environmentally friendly infrastructure.

There are many options for people to reduce their carbon emissions while moving from place to place, but the reduction in driving would greatly benefit students and the damaged environment.

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