Bali dance – Balibs http://balibs.org/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 17:57:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://balibs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Bali dance – Balibs http://balibs.org/ 32 32 Arab states dance hard towards decarbonization – Universities https://balibs.org/arab-states-dance-hard-towards-decarbonization-universities/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 02:16:56 +0000 https://balibs.org/arab-states-dance-hard-towards-decarbonization-universities/ Jessie Moritz (360infos) Canberra ● Mon 14 November 2022 2022-11-14 09:14 0 c5efdab62cf99b86ccd9cf64827623a6 2 Academia fossil fuels, energy transition, climate change, Indonesia, oil and gas, G20 Free Of all the nations debating the energy transition at the upcoming G20 summit in Bali, the oil and gas-rich countries of the Arabian Peninsula are among the most […]]]>

Jessie Moritz (360infos)

Canberra ●
Mon 14 November 2022

2022-11-14
09:14
0
c5efdab62cf99b86ccd9cf64827623a6
2
Academia
fossil fuels, energy transition, climate change, Indonesia, oil and gas, G20
Free

Of all the nations debating the energy transition at the upcoming G20 summit in Bali, the oil and gas-rich countries of the Arabian Peninsula are among the most exposed to decarbonization.

Their economies remain dependent on continued global demand for fossil fuels, and while they have long pursued economic diversification strategies designed to develop non-oil and gas industries, decarbonization has only recently become a key priority.

But this G20 is the first in which all G20 nations have national low-carbon development goals.

While the climate change and energy transition strategies announced in the oil and gas producing countries of the Arabian Peninsula have been dismissed by some as greenwashingthe stakes for these countries – both from climate change and the economic transformation needed to prepare for a post-fossil energy era – are extremely high.

Without successful action on climate change, these states face a future of more intense and extreme dust storms, heat waves and more deadly “wet bulb” conditions, where humidity and heat exceed capacity. cooling of the human body. If climate action succeeds, they will have to deal with the destruction of the fossil fuels that have been the basis of their economy for much of the last century.

Since 2017, there has been a flurry of climate change and net zero targets announced by Arab states as they seek to portray themselves as international climate leaders, as evidenced by the UAE’s bid to host COP28. These range from stand-alone climate change strategies – such as the UAE’s National Climate Change Plan released in 2017 – to Kuwait’s more modest commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 7, 4% by 2035.

Both Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have announced circular economy policies since 2020, and over the past 18 months, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman and, most recently, Kuwait have set net zero emissions targets for 2050 (or 2060 for Saudi Arabia and Kuwait). ).

Climate change and energy transition policies have extended rather than replaced existing economic diversification strategies and will face similar challenges in their implementation.

Energy subsidy reform, a key element of diversification, has proven hard. Attempts to cut fuel and electricity subsidies in recent years have drawn popular outcry, such as in Kuwait in 2015 and in Oman and Saudi Arabia in 2017-18.

With the exception of the United Arab Emirates, where fuel subsidies were removed in 2015, subsidy reform has been implemented on an intermittent basis. A common strategy to respond to public discontent has been to reform subsidies while protecting citizens from increases in the cost of living – as with Saudi Arabia’s Citizens Account program, created in 2017. This means that if migrant workers – who make up over 80% of the population in Qatar and the United Arab Emirates are incentivized to reduce their energy consumption and carbon footprint, while citizens are not.

Economic diversification and climate change strategies in the Gulf are designed to prepare for the post-oil era. However, their economic diversification strategies rely on maximizing oil and gas exports, which increases global carbon emissions.

Due to population growth and previous efforts to diversify into heavy, energy-intensive industries, domestic consumption of oil and gas has increased. skyrockets, reducing the revenues that could otherwise be generated by the export of these hydrocarbons. The decarbonization strategies announced in the Gulf States therefore focus on increasing the share of renewable energy in national electricity production, thus freeing up oil and gas for export.

This is also why the Gulf States are likely to emphasize the role of oil and gas in the transition to renewable energy at the G20 Leaders’ Summit, particularly in the context of their increased role in energy security. world after the Russian invasion of Ukraine. While they invest in the production of alternative energies such as blue and green hydrogen, they remain, for the time being, dependent on the continued global demand for oil and gas.

Deadly heat waves and extreme weather events have highlighted the very real impacts of climate change for the Gulf region. Gulf governments are clearly prioritizing climate action to a much greater extent than in previous decades. However, their ultimate success depends on their ability to overcome existing development challenges that have complicated previous diversification efforts, as well as reconciling their status as hydrocarbon producers with their efforts to appear climate progressive.

The author is a lecturer at the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies at the Australian National University. She co-leads the energy and climate security research cluster at the Institute for Climate, Energy, and Disaster Solutions.

Originally published under Creative Commons by 360info™.


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Dr. Karkare gets first place at the International Dance and Music Festival https://balibs.org/dr-karkare-gets-first-place-at-the-international-dance-and-music-festival/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 09:40:50 +0000 https://balibs.org/dr-karkare-gets-first-place-at-the-international-dance-and-music-festival/ Dewas (Madhya Pradesh): A resident of Director of Dewas and Shraddha Hospital, Dr. Aparna Karkare won the International Dance and Music Festival competition organized by Pune All Folk Arts Cultural Society in Bali, Indonesia from November 1-3. According to Dr. Ajay Karkare, she got the first place in the single semi-classical dance competition in the […]]]>

Dewas (Madhya Pradesh): A resident of Director of Dewas and Shraddha Hospital, Dr. Aparna Karkare won the International Dance and Music Festival competition organized by Pune All Folk Arts Cultural Society in Bali, Indonesia from November 1-3. According to Dr. Ajay Karkare, she got the first place in the single semi-classical dance competition in the senior category.

Notably, she was undergoing Kathak training at Ghunghru Nritya Academy, Dewas for the past six months. On this achievement, academy director Praful Singh Gehlot was also honored with the Tanaji Rao Nannavare International Guru Ratna award. Everyone congratulated them.

Urban forest to be built in Dewas

A municipal forest will be built on the open space of Madhumilan Square near Bhandari Hospital and in front of Bavdia Police Station to improve air quality and increase green belt in Dewas town.

According to information, this work will be funded by the Madhya Pradesh Pollution Board and advice will be given by the Department of Environment and Forests, Dewas. The site was inspected by Municipal Corporation Commissioner Vishal Singh Chauhan in the presence of Municipal Garden Manager Dinesh Chauhan, Firefighter Jitendra Sisodia, Assistant Engineer Dilip Malviya, Palak Srivastava and others.

Workshop on ‘Swachh Innovative Technology’ organized for NGOs

A workshop on “Swachh Innovative Technology” was organized by Dewas Municipal Corporation for the various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) at the municipality office at the new bus station.

Members of social organizations like Act-eve Foundation, Anugrah Welfare Foundation, Helping Hand organization, Shivagya Sanstha and others actively participated. Speakers encouraged attendees to come up with unique ideas for plastic waste management, social inclusion and more.

Along with this, they also called on people to share their thoughts about it at dmccompetition@gmail.com or WhatsApp numbers 9425060985, 79995 60750 and 910987244.

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Body in Motion Dance Class teaches students about movement and self-care https://balibs.org/body-in-motion-dance-class-teaches-students-about-movement-and-self-care/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 18:10:56 +0000 https://balibs.org/body-in-motion-dance-class-teaches-students-about-movement-and-self-care/ Students incorporated self-care methods, learned about the body, and worked on movement and dance exercises during a Body in Motion Block 2 dance class. “The course is based on the principle that the body can be a source of knowledge. By listening, touching and observing one’s own body and working collaboratively with their peers, students […]]]>

Students incorporated self-care methods, learned about the body, and worked on movement and dance exercises during a Body in Motion Block 2 dance class.

“The course is based on the principle that the body can be a source of knowledge. By listening, touching and observing one’s own body and working collaboratively with their peers, students practice experiential learning daily. We movement every day. We rest, we run, we play, we dance, we explore, we play more, we reflect, we discuss, we process, and we journal. Together,” says Patrizia Herminjard ’96, lecturer in dance in the Department of Theater and Dance.

There were 26 students enrolled in the class, which isn’t unusual because Herminjard’s classes usually attract a large number of students, says Shaylan Quinnthe academic administrative assistant of the department.

“I chose Body in Motion because I heard rave comments on the course, as well as the teacher. I was also very drawn to the self-care and mindfulness aspect of the course, and the idea that caring for and understanding your body can be a form of duty,” says Eliza Broan ’25.

Broan’s favorite part of the class was the self-care homework assigned to them.

It was a necessary addition to my life to look at my day from an intentional perspective. Much of college for me was scheduled and repetitive, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but this block allowed me to step back and see what I was doing with my days that contributed or harmed my well-being,” says Brown.

Another important lesson Broan learned was how to notice minor changes and feelings in his body, which improved his understanding of how his brain and body communicate during and through movement.

Some questions class members asked were how to gain knowledge of themselves and others through listening, what is listening, how can they listen without expectation or judgment, and how they can stay open to change, says Herminjard, a graduate from Colorado. College with a degree in philosophy.

Many students in the course appreciated the sense of community created by their class.

“Patrizia fostered a sense of community and trust that allowed my class to fully engage in all kinds of play to move our bodies or trust each other,” says Greer Harnden ’23.

“I learned to pay attention to my body, and that led me to behave in a way that suited me better. I also learned to prioritize self-love and self-care,” Harden says.

A typical day would start with students gathering in a circle, where they would discuss class assignments or field trips, then stretch and do other warm-up exercises, to prepare for any type of movement they would do that day. The exercises ranged from contact improvisation with a partner to individualized experimentation with the Feldenkrais methodBroan said.

The Feldenkrais Method asks students to slow down and pay attention to their small movements, Harnden says.

Both Broan and Harnden agreed that the class would feel different if it wasn’t taught on the block plan.

“Part of the great thing about this class is that you are, for lack of a better word, forced into full immersion in self-care. It allows you to understand your body and your mind in a way that I personally never realized before,” says Broan. “Being in class for three hours, moving, practicing mindfulness and experiencing new ways to connect our body and mind is a really special thing. When we leave at noon and come home unstressed by any other class and honestly and diligently focus on how to integrate self-care and better movement practices into our daily lives, it is something I never thought I’d need, but I’m so glad I was able to find out.”

“The bouldering plan allowed me to fully immerse myself in this class. If we were on a semester system, I wouldn’t be able to attend fully as this course requires because I’d be focusing on so many different things,” says Harnden, an education student. “For example, in the first week, our homework was to focus on self-care and doing something that concerns us every day. If I had been enrolled in three or four other courses, I would not have been able to immerse myself in this self-care process and would not have gained as much from it.

At first, Grace Witulski ’25 struggled to understand the purpose of the Self-Care Mission, but after the first week, it became clear.

“The deeper purpose of this assignment was to help us internalize how the craziness of everyday life, especially in college, can make it difficult for us as students to include moments of self-care in our daily routines. The mission showed us how important implementing self-care can be and how it can really have a positive effect on our overall mental health,” says Witulski.

In addition to self-care assignments, students were given creative and visual assignments, including a “body map,” where students made a life-size drawing of themselves that incorporated different elements of their identity and of their history with movements in an abstract or realistic way.

A remarkable class exercise for Harnden was when students were tasked with pretending a classmate was clay and then molding them across the room.

Witulski agreed the class would have been “very different” if it hadn’t taken place on the block plan. “Much of the class discussed self-care and how to deal with the craziness of life with ‘self-care’ moments, which vary by each student’s personal definition. Because it was our only class, we were able to really disengage from common stressors like classroom work and focus more deeply on what self-care was,” says Witulski.

Witulski’s favorite part of the course was the excursions they took, especially when they went to a live performance of Bandaloop Dance Companyan aerial dance group, at the University of Denver, where the group danced around the sides of buildings.

Almost exactly 14 years ago, Bandaloop played on campus at Colorado College inaugural performance of the Cornerstone Arts Center.

Herminjard says she hopes her students will leave the classroom knowing that their bodies are a rich source of knowledge and that caring for and listening to their bodies is vital for their mental and physical well-being, she says.

Herminjard co-chaired dance workshop during her studies, then directed the CC Dance Festival from 2007 to 2013. She danced professionally in New York and performed and taught in Taiwan, China, Bali and Switzerland.

The class, which took place at Cossitt Hall, satisfied the creative process requirement of all colleges.

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“Ticket to Paradise” Reviewed: Let these figurines riff and dance! https://balibs.org/ticket-to-paradise-reviewed-let-these-figurines-riff-and-dance/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 21:58:48 +0000 https://balibs.org/ticket-to-paradise-reviewed-let-these-figurines-riff-and-dance/ The recent sharp decline in willingness to date someone across party lines isn’t the reason the romantic comedy is nearly dead, but it does point to the problem. The rom-com genre is inherently plot-driven, while few viewers doubt more than romance itself is anything but character-driven. Romantic comedies are mechanics designed around characters with exactly […]]]>

The recent sharp decline in willingness to date someone across party lines isn’t the reason the romantic comedy is nearly dead, but it does point to the problem. The rom-com genre is inherently plot-driven, while few viewers doubt more than romance itself is anything but character-driven. Romantic comedies are mechanics designed around characters with exactly the traits that seem to be obstacles to their romance; the machinery of the plot determines whether they will fall in love despite these traits or because of them. Today, the tight-format genre produces the stories that know too little: few viewers are likely to overlook the mesh of details, the shared passions and life goals, the mutual discoveries, the connections of experiences and the visions of the world, perspectives and ambitions, on which lasting relationships are created. Few are fooled by the spark of love at first sight, the fire of attraction, not because such instantaneous but powerful bonds are false or unreliable, but on the contrary because they can mean immediate recognition. of a vast spectrum of hidden connections and affinities. which will fuel the flames over time.

It’s a long way of saying that the stick figures set in motion in romantic comedies derive their simulation of amplitude from the power of the stars. The lead actors must convey a volume of personality and a weight of experience that the scripted characters do not have. “Ticket to Paradise,” starring George Clooney and Julia Roberts (such is their billing), depends on that power to fill a simple frame of a story. He offers them too little to work with, too little guidance, too much blank space to fill. The couple they embody is charged with a personal story that the film never develops, never even reveals; their action focuses on a second couple – one involving their daughter – who get even less character development. Inasmuch as the film’s charm depends on that of its two stars, they are so rigidly constrained to the artifices of the plot that they have virtually no wiggle room, virtually no chance of simply being watched, and are extracted live advertising. pictures of themselves.

Georgia Cotton (Roberts), a high profile gallerist, and David Cotton (Clooney), a major project architect, were married for five years, divorced two decades ago and have lived apart ever since, in unquenchable acrimony and a mutual recrimination. . They couldn’t avoid each other because they have a daughter, Lily (Kaitlyn Dever), who, to kick off the action, is a law school graduate. (Even the former couple’s presence at the ceremony leads to a public bout of competitive squabbling.) With work ahead of her, Lily heads to a tropical resort in Bali for a vacation with her best friend, Wren ( Billie Lourd). There, in a moment of panic during a swim in the open sea, Lily meets cute Gede (Maxime Bouttier), a young man from the island who works as a seaweed farmer, and it’s the coup de lightning. Lily and Gede plan to get married soon; they will live in Bali, and Lily will give up her job as a lawyer (indeed, she seems ready to give up her legal career). When Lily tells her parents about this plan, they spring into action, flying to Bali ostensibly to attend the wedding, but in fact to enact a wacky plan to prevent it – separating the young couple and bringing Lily back. home, work and the life she would otherwise leave behind.

Even before the plot gears kick in, David and Georgia’s feuds are both obvious and fragile. On the one hand, the backbiting is so easy-going and intimate that it looks like the banter of a longtime couple from the outset rather than the bile of a broken couple; yet, on the other hand, nothing in the film suggests why their breakup was so bitter, why the venom remains. The void of their common hatred is in one piece with the masked generality of the characters themselves. The two worldly protagonists have nothing to say to each other, neither to others, nor even to friends by SMS or e-mail. The film, written by Ol Parker (who also directed) and Daniel Pipski, reduces them to mere symbols of middle-aged, mid-career success with nothing, let alone experience or sensibility, to show, except for another great tacit: money.

In the Hollywood of long ago that exploded around the time of the Cottons’ marriage, in which character types trumped character, money might not have been a topic. In “Ticket to Paradise”, the wealth of the protagonists raises questions that the film never confronts, even if it is the very basis of the plot. Not only do Georgia and David give up everything for their trip, which they stuff with unquestioned comfort and luxury, but they seem to have passed on that level of economic freedom – and the joyous confidence that goes with it – to Lily herself. So it seems no one knows, as Lily and Gede are also obscured by the film’s sketchy script. They’re the most interesting couple, and their apparent differences suggest an even more dramatic mesh of personalities, traits, and experiences. The depiction of the young couple’s immediate bond is done in the blink of an eye, with a cliched snap of Lily beaming and breathless, and leaves them with almost nothing defined except – in a revealing touch that suggests this non-white ‘exotic’ and ostensible is really like “us” – for Gede explaining that he and his father, also a seaweed farmer, have a contract with Whole Foods. The essence of the plot is the instrumentalization of Lily by the elder Cottons and the dismissal of Gede – the parents treating the young couple as objects of their own designs, instruments of their own will. Rather than counteracting this cavalier self-centeredness by developing Gede and Lily in great detail, the film reproduces and reinforces it.

Parker’s scope as director is as narrow and cramped as the screenplay. The chemistry between Roberts and Clooney is superficial, sweet and lovable, and the stars never let go. The one notable scene of flashy, invigorating physical action – it’s a dance to accompany a game of beer pong – is filmed so confined and tightly edited that it looks like a thirty-second Viagra commercial. Even the natural glories of the island appear on a green background. Only Gede’s father, Wayan (Agung Pindha), has a real sense of humor; the only touch of charm is a moment when Gede shows he’s inherited it.

The obvious innovation in Judd Apatow’s rom-coms is to let actors full of fun characters go wild with their humor. But the underlying innovation is perhaps most important: the structuring of his films on the missing, but implicit, hype and fleshing out of relationships through emotionally murderous conversations. His classics involve what I call the Time Cassavetes (yet there is also something Bergmanic about it) – the implicit power of the complexity of its characters, which is largely only hinted at, but decisively so. (“Ticket to Paradise” doesn’t even involve a Cassavetes minute.) The latter-day romantic comedy that puts such scenes into action, Noah Baumbach”Greenberg,” candidly looks at the dramatic implications of romance based more on character than on situations. In “Ticket to Paradise,” Parker sticks to antiquated rom-com archetypes; in the process, it neglects and obliterates the two couples that engage at the center of the action. It omits the substance, the human factor, that would bring its stripped-down yet solid frame to life. ♦

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Bali 2023 dance show delights delegates on first day of ANOC General Assembly https://balibs.org/bali-2023-dance-show-delights-delegates-on-first-day-of-anoc-general-assembly/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 05:01:21 +0000 https://balibs.org/bali-2023-dance-show-delights-delegates-on-first-day-of-anoc-general-assembly/ You viewed more than 50 articles in the last 12 months. Keep Olympic News Free Support insidethegames.biz for just £10 For nearly 15 years now, insidethegames.biz has been at the forefront of fearlessly reporting on what is happening in the Olympic Movement. As the first website not to be placed behind a paywall, we have […]]]>

Keep Olympic News Free

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For nearly 15 years now, insidethegames.biz has been at the forefront of fearlessly reporting on what is happening in the Olympic Movement. As the first website not to be placed behind a paywall, we have made information about the International Olympic Committee, the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Commonwealth Games and other major events more accessible to everyone than ever before.

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Ranveer Singh Takes Khilji Look Dance With Hollywood Director SHAQUILLE https://balibs.org/ranveer-singh-takes-khilji-look-dance-with-hollywood-director-shaquille/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 08:25:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/ranveer-singh-takes-khilji-look-dance-with-hollywood-director-shaquille/ Bollywood | Every child remembers the character of Alauddin Khilji played by Ranveer Singh in the movie Padmavat. Ranveer Singh had brought that humility to the face that was needed for this character. Ranveer Singh once again appeared in avatar of Alauddin Khilji and he also shared this video on social media for his fans.Ranveer’s […]]]>
Bollywood | Every child remembers the character of Alauddin Khilji played by Ranveer Singh in the movie Padmavat. Ranveer Singh had brought that humility to the face that was needed for this character. Ranveer Singh once again appeared in avatar of Alauddin Khilji and he also shared this video on social media for his fans.Ranveer’s ‘Khilji Dance’ with DirectorIn this video, Ranveer Singh is seen dancing to the song Khali Bali from the movie Padmavat and is accompanied by famous Hollywood director SHAQUILLE. SHAQUILLE, who is twice the size of Ranveer Singh, tries to follow in his footsteps. Sharing this video, Ranveer wrote – Big Man Vs Bad Man.

Crazy stars in the comments sectionRanveer Singh wrote in the caption – This is the collaboration you didn’t know how much you needed. Yes, you read that right. Many people have commented on this post by Ranveer Singh. One user wrote – Attack of the shaq, while Vishal Dadlani wrote – Hahahahaha… He’s really really big.Ravana with ‘Khilji Look’ is trolledMany fans also commented on this post by Ranveer Singh. A user wrote – Only you can do this by Shaik. Let us tell you that while the character of Alauddin Khilji played by Ranveer Singh has become a hit, people are trolling Ravana character played by Saif Ali Khan in Adipurush movie by calling him Khilji-looking Ravana.

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Ragamala Dance Company will perform FIRES OF VARANASI at Soorya Festival this month https://balibs.org/ragamala-dance-company-will-perform-fires-of-varanasi-at-soorya-festival-this-month/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 18:22:26 +0000 https://balibs.org/ragamala-dance-company-will-perform-fires-of-varanasi-at-soorya-festival-this-month/ Ranee and Aparna Ramaswamy’s Ragamala Dance Company, now in its 30th year, presents Fires of Varanasi: Dance of the Eternal Pilgrim at the 45th Annual Soorya Festival from October 11-17, 2022 at various locations in Kerala, India. This six-performance engagement is part of Ragamala’s 22/23 season, which culminates with a 30th anniversary gala celebration in […]]]>

Ranee and Aparna Ramaswamy’s Ragamala Dance Company, now in its 30th year, presents Fires of Varanasi: Dance of the Eternal Pilgrim at the 45th Annual Soorya Festival from October 11-17, 2022 at various locations in Kerala, India. This six-performance engagement is part of Ragamala’s 22/23 season, which culminates with a 30th anniversary gala celebration in July 2023. For more information, visit ragamaladance.org/upcoming.

Rooted in the expansive South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam, Ragamala Dance Company manifests a kinship relationship between the ancient and the contemporary. In their final one-night performance, Fires of Varanasi: Dance of the Eternal Pilgrim, eleven dancers conjure up a realm where time stands still and humans merge with the divine. Award-winning creators Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy imagine a metaphorical passageway that enters a ritual world of immortality, evoking the birth-death-rebirth continuum in Hindu thought to honor the life and death experiences of immigrants in the diaspora .

The reigning deity of Varanasi is Shiva, whose locks flow the Ganges. He is celebrated, invoked and worshiped in this sacred city, where his dance transforms the desolation of the cremation ground into a wonderful bhakti experience.

Bharatanatyam artists Aparna Ramaswamy and Ranee Ramaswamy have toured their work extensively and are renowned for their rigor, physique and poetic expression. They are senior disciples of Padma Bhushan Smt. Valli alarm.

The performances will each take place in a different location:

October 11, 2022: Kovalam

October 12, 2022: Varkala

October 13, 2022: Changanasseri

October 14, 2022: Vadagara

October 15, 2022: Pinarayi

October 17, 2022: Thiruvanathapuram

Ragamala Dance Company is the vision of award-winning mother/daughter artists Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy. Over the past four decades, Ranee and Aparna’s practice in the South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam has created a unique trajectory for culturally rooted performing arts in the United States to create an exemplary company in the landscape of American dance. Through intimate solos and large-scale theatrical works for the stage, Ranee and Aparna enhance the South Asian American experience. By engaging the dynamic tension between ancestral wisdom and creative freedom, they reveal the kindred relationship between ancient and contemporary that today’s world urgently needs. ragamaladance.org

About Ragamala Dance Company

Ragamala Dance Company was founded in 1992 by Ranee Ramaswamy and is under the direction of artistic directors Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy, and choreographic associate Ashwini Ramaswamy (mother and daughters). Rooted in the South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam, the company has been hailed by The New York Times as “moving, imaginative, and rhythmically infectious.”

Ragamala Dance Company is a pioneering, cross-generational, family-based organization committed to the idea that while history is tied to time, the stories we share are timeless. Ragamala’s work in the performing arts is extensive. Ragamala looks far beyond the stage to realize the kinship between ancient and contemporary that today’s world urgently needs. Ragamala engages in collaborative practice with a myriad of artists and aesthetics and is rooted in the idea of ​​Bharatanatyam as a dynamic living tradition. Ranee and Aparna’s training under legendary artist Alarmél Valli is the foundation of a creative philosophy that stems from beauty, truth and spirit.

With Aparna Ramaswamy as the principal dancer, Ragamala has been commissioned and performed across the United States, India and abroad, highlighted by the Kennedy Center (Washington, DC), Joyce Theater (New York) , Lincoln Center (New York), Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival (MA), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), American Dance Festival (Durham, North Carolina), The Soraya (Southern California), Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, International Festival of Arts & Ideas (New Haven, CT), Cal Performances (Berkeley), Arts Center at NYU Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates), Just Festival (Edinburgh, United Kingdom), Bali Arts Festival (Indonesia), Sri Krishna Gana Sabha (Chennai, India) and National Center for Performing Arts (Mumbai, India), among others.

Ranee Ramaswamy sits on the National Arts Council, appointed by President barack obama. Recent awards and honors include Guggenheim Fellowship, Doris Duke Performing Artist Award, Bogliasco Foundation Fellowship (Italy), Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Fellowship (Italy), United States Artists Fellowship, and McKnight Distinguished Artist Award.

Aparna is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Doris Duke Performing Artist Award, Bogliasco Foundation Fellowship (Italy), Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Research Fellowship (Italy), Joyce Award, and Bush Fellowship for Choreography, among others, and was selected as the one of Dance Magazine’s 25 to watch in 2010. ragamaladance.org

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Gamelan Sekar Jaya performs Balinese dance and music at the North Columbia Schoolhouse https://balibs.org/gamelan-sekar-jaya-performs-balinese-dance-and-music-at-the-north-columbia-schoolhouse/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/gamelan-sekar-jaya-performs-balinese-dance-and-music-at-the-north-columbia-schoolhouse/ The much-loved San Francisco Bay Area company will perform on Saturday, September 24 at North Columbia School Cultural Center on San Juan Ridge. Gamelan Sekar Jaya is a non-profit organization based in Berkeley, dedicated to fostering artistic exchange between Bali, Indonesia and the United States. Founded in 1979, they have performed throughout California, the United […]]]>

The much-loved San Francisco Bay Area company will perform on Saturday, September 24 at North Columbia School Cultural Center on San Juan Ridge.

Gamelan Sekar Jaya is a non-profit organization based in Berkeley, dedicated to fostering artistic exchange between Bali, Indonesia and the United States. Founded in 1979, they have performed throughout California, the United States and Bali – in venues ranging from the New York Symphony Space to remote Bali village squares. The show will unfold under the dappled pinks and oranges of the sunset, framed by the towering pines that surround the amphitheater. Audiences are invited to spread out a blanket or roam freely to admire the show from multiple angles and enjoy the intricate rhythms and virtuosic sensibility of Balinese music and dance.

Balinese dance encompasses a wide range of styles and forms. The details of music and dance are closely coordinated; an ideal of complete unity is sought in every gesture, nuance, expression, phrase and rhythm. Dance plays a central role not only in sacred activities, in a temple or at a sacred spring, but in profane ones. Gamelan Sekar Jaya continues this tradition by offering programs composed mainly of dance works, ranging from solos to larger group choreographies.



In this performance, you’ll enjoy the tunes of three of Sekar Jaya’s instrumental ensembles: the exciting and awe-inspiring gamelan bamboo jegog from West Bali; the serene and complex genre wayang ensemble traditionally used to accompany Balinese shadow play; and the popular and cheerful gamelan angklung, accompanying Sekar Jaya’s company of dancers.

This performance introduces the 2022-2023 guest artistic directors of Sekar Jaya Ni Nyoman Srayamurtikanti (music) and Cok Istri Putri Rukmini (dance) to the northern Colombian community, and presents the “Margapati” challenge, a dance in the bebancihan style androgynous.



Mang Sraya is a gamelan musician currently pursuing her career as a composer. Mang Sraya is the daughter of I Nyoman Suryadi, a natural artist, composer and singer from Celuk village in Sukawati, Gianyar, Bali. Mang Sraya has studied Balinese gamelan since elementary school under various master teachers, including his father, I Ketut Cater, I Made Subandi and others. His education has focused on the arts since his studies at SMKN 3 Sukawati, a high school specializing in the arts, and the Institute of Indonesian Arts in Denpasar (Institute Seni Indonesia or ISI Denpasar). During his residency with Sekar Jaya, Mang Sria has just completed his master’s degree in music composition at the Surakarta branch of the Institute for Indonesian Arts. Mang Sria is also the head of Sanggar S’mara Murti, originally founded by his father. Mang Sraya started composing in 2017 and his works are based on the intersection of tradition and innovation in Balinese arts. Mang Sria has represented Indonesia at events across Southeast Asia, and his music has been featured at regional, national and international events. In 2020, she was the featured guest on Gamelan Sekar Jaya’s Bali’s Living Arts speaker series. This residency will be Mang Sria’s first visit to the United States.

Cok Pring is a respected dancer and teacher from Singapadu, Bali, Indonesia. Trained from an early age in her village, she then attended a high school specializing in arts in Batubulan, Bali, and later obtained her bachelor’s degree at the Institute of Indonesian Arts in Denpasar (Institut Seni Indonesia or ISI Denpasar, formerly known as the name of STSI Denpasar) in 1996. After graduating from STSI, Cok Pring worked for the Ministry of Culture (Province of Bali) for five years. During this time, she remained active as a performer and teacher, winning numerous awards and accolades from regional and national sources. Cok Pring has toured Southeast Asia extensively, including Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia, and has performed in Spain, Australia, the United States, Japan and Great Britain. Cok Pring currently maintains a busy teaching schedule from her home in Singapadu, where she trains and coaches Balinese and international students in dance and arja, a Balinese tradition of dramatic dance.

It is one of the best Balinese gamelan orchestras outside of Bali and definitely worth a visit! Whether you’ve been to Bali or not, you’ll enjoy the mesmerizing music and amazing, provocative dancing. Completely mesmerizing!

Tickets for this show are available at Mother Truckers and on the North Columbia Schoolhouse website. For more information, visit http://www.northcolumbiaschoolhouse.org.

Source: North Columbia School Cultural Center

Balinese dance encompasses a wide range of styles and forms. The details of music and dance are closely coordinated; an ideal of complete unity is sought in every gesture, nuance, expression, phrase and rhythm.
Photo submitted

Cok Pring is a respected dancer and teacher from Singapadu, Bali, Indonesia.
Photo submitted

In this performance, you’ll enjoy the tunes of three of Sekar Jaya’s instrumental ensembles: the exciting and awe-inspiring gamelan bamboo jegog from West Bali; the serene and complex genre wayang ensemble traditionally used to accompany Balinese shadow play; and the popular and cheerful gamelan angklung, accompanying Sekar Jaya’s company of dancers.
Photo submitted

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Ragamala Dance Company appoints Erik Madsen-Bond as General Manager https://balibs.org/ragamala-dance-company-appoints-erik-madsen-bond-as-general-manager/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/ragamala-dance-company-appoints-erik-madsen-bond-as-general-manager/ Ragamala Dance Company has announced Erik Madsen-Bond as its new General Manager. Erik comes into this role after seven years with the company, most recently as Director of Operations, where he played a key role in community engagement, tour management and administrative operations. In this new role, Erik will work with Artistic Directors Ranee and […]]]>

Ragamala Dance Company has announced Erik Madsen-Bond as its new General Manager. Erik comes into this role after seven years with the company, most recently as Director of Operations, where he played a key role in community engagement, tour management and administrative operations.

In this new role, Erik will work with Artistic Directors Ranee and Aparna Ramaswamy to shape the ambitious and exhilarating growth of Ragamala as the company celebrates its 30th anniversary season.

“Erik’s contribution to Ragamala has been evident from the start. His keen analytical and strategic skills, combined with his long-standing commitment to the performing arts as a driving force for change, make him the perfect fit for this leadership role,” said Aparna Ramaswamy , Executive Artistic Director.

Each year, Ragamala’s efforts to strengthen the South Asian American experience deepen. Throughout the pandemic, Ragamala was determined to engage with its audience and hosted 102,733 virtual audience members. With the return to live programming, Ragamala had 9,168 in-person viewers. In response to recent performances at the American Dance Festival, an audience member said, “Thank you for what you are doing to shine a light on our dance tradition to make it an equal player in the cultural landscape of this country.”

For more information on Ragamala and their upcoming season, visit ragamaladance.org.

About Erik Madsen-Bond

Erik Madsen-Bond joined Ragamala Dance Company in 2015, holding several key administrative roles in operations, tour management and community engagement.

As a member of the leadership team, Erik works closely with Aparna Ramaswamy (Executive Artistic Director), Ranee Ramaswamy (Founder & Artistic Director) and the Board of Directors to create and implement strategies that drive progress the objectives of the organization.

Erik has led Ragamala’s tours with national and international presenters including Kennedy Center (DC), Lincoln Center (NY), American Dance Festival (NC), Northrop (MN), Dartmouth College (NH), the Harris Theater (IL), New York University Abu Dhabi (UAE), Joyce Theater (NY), University of Texas, Jacob’s Pillow (MA), and more. His Minneapolis-St. Paul-based community and public engagement work for Ragamala includes partnerships with the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minnesota History Center, Ordway, Northrop, India Association of Minnesota, and more . The engagement projects he has managed have been funded by Dance/USA, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Knight Foundation, Saint Paul STAR, Minnesota State Arts Board, National Endowment for the Arts, and more.

Erik has served as an artist panelist for Arts Midwest’s Emerging Artist Primer and a grant-making panelist for the Minnesota State Arts Board and the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council. Erik holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Carleton College and is a native of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

About Ragamala Dance Company

Ragamala Dance Company is the vision of award-winning mother/daughter artists Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy. Over the past four decades, Ranee and Aparna’s practice in the South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam has altered the trajectory of culturally rooted performing arts in the United States to create an exemplary company in the American dance landscape. . Through intimate solos and large-scale theatrical works for the stage, Ranee and Aparna enhance the South Asian American experience. By engaging the dynamic tension between ancestral wisdom and creative freedom, they reveal the kindred relationship between ancient and contemporary that today’s world urgently needs.

With Aparna Ramaswamy as the principal dancer, Ragamala has been commissioned and performed across the United States, India and abroad, highlighted by the Kennedy Center (Washington, DC), Joyce Theater (New York) , Lincoln Center (New York), Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival (MA), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), American Dance Festival (Durham, North Carolina), The Soraya (Southern California), Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, International Festival of Arts & Ideas (New Haven, CT), Cal Performances (Berkeley), Arts Center at NYU Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates), Just Festival (Edinburgh, United Kingdom), Bali Arts Festival (Indonesia), Sri Krishna Gana Sabha (Chennai, India) and National Center for Performing Arts (Mumbai, India), among others. ragamaladance.org.

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BALAM Dance Theater will join the Putnam County Dance Project for TAKING FLIGHT this month https://balibs.org/balam-dance-theater-will-join-the-putnam-county-dance-project-for-taking-flight-this-month/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 16:13:26 +0000 https://balibs.org/balam-dance-theater-will-join-the-putnam-county-dance-project-for-taking-flight-this-month/ BALAM Dance Theater (BALAM), a non-profit professional dance theater company, once again joins the Putnam County Dance Project (PCDP) in a revival performance of Taking Flight, an afternoon of modern and cultural dances, Saturday, September 24 at 4 p.m. The show will be performed at Arts on the Lake, 640 NY-52, Carmel Hamlet in New […]]]>

BALAM Dance Theater (BALAM), a non-profit professional dance theater company, once again joins the Putnam County Dance Project (PCDP) in a revival performance of Taking Flight, an afternoon of modern and cultural dances, Saturday, September 24 at 4 p.m. The show will be performed at Arts on the Lake, 640 NY-52, Carmel Hamlet in New York 10512. A rain date is scheduled for Sunday, September 25 at 2 p.m. Tickets ranging from $5 to $30, with free seats, can be purchased. online at https://cloud.broadwayworld.com/rec/ticketclick.cfm?fromlink=2197512®id=84&articlelink=https%3A%2F%2Fartsonthelake.org%2Fevent?utm_source=BWW2022&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=article&utm_content=bottombuybutton1.

This family-friendly show held along the beautiful Hudson River in eastern Putnam County, New York celebrates cultures and dreams. The program highlights the true story of a woman’s journey from refugee to record-breaking pilot and global ambassador for STEM education.

BALAM Dance Theatre’s cultural dances, specially curated for this program, feature Balinese, French and Spanish techniques. They include the shimmering Balinese dance duo, Oleg Tambulilingan (Love Dance of the Bumblebees), performed by Balinese BALAM artist Nani Devi, and the 19th century Spanish Escuela Bolera duo, Pandaderos de la Flamenca, with artistic director of BALAM, Carlos Fittante, and Spanish dance. specialist Barbara Romero. In the final piece, Fandango (circa 1786), Fittante performs his choreography fusing French Baroque and Spanish Escuela Bolera dance techniques accompanied by period musician Ryan Closs on Baroque guitar live.

Inspired by “Fly Girl Fly”, a children’s biographical book written by Nancy Roe Pimm, this program references the true story of Shaesta Waiz, who grows from a small child fleeing Afghanistan to become an inspirational American pilot flying solo on five continents around the world. A role model for young people around the world, Waiz’s remarkable achievements inspire young people around the world, and especially girls, to pursue their education and their own dreams.

Other guest dancers from New York will present dances from around the world, including West Africa, Argentina, Bali, Egypt, India, Israel and Japan. Salma Khowaja, a local Putnam County resident of Afghan descent, trained the PCDP dancers in some traditional steps of the “Attan” dance and helped them create their own performance version of this national dance of Afghanistan. .

About BALAM Dance Theater

Founded by choreographer and movement researcher Islene Pinder, BALAM Dance Theater offers a new vision of contemporary dance rooted in the dazzling opulence and magical aura of Balinese theatre.

The New York-based dance/theatre company creates a unique entertainment experience that has universal appeal. Audiences of all ages and backgrounds enjoy BALAM’s innovative movement alchemy where dynamic athleticism, detailed skills and movement techniques from around the world and eras are fused and enhanced by eclectic music, striking masks , vibrant costumes and fantastic stories.

The company educates the community about the dances and cultures present in its repertoire. Through its Out & About series, free and affordable local creative shows, workshops and events are made available to families, children, students and community residents.

BALAM has been featured in numerous festivals and venues including First Night New York; Lincoln Center exterior; Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival; Downtown Dance Festival; and also appeared in the United States and around the world. The company has received praise from the New York Times and Village Voice, the Governor and Residents of Bali and the Indonesian Consulate in New York, and others.

For more information, call 646-361-9183 or visit BALAM Dance Theater on their blog, www.balamdancetheatre.blogspot.com. Follow the company on Facebook, www.facebook.com/balamdancetheatreand check for updates on Twitter @BALAMDance.

Photo credit: Julie Lemberger

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