Bali dance – Balibs http://balibs.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 01:46:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://balibs.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Bali dance – Balibs http://balibs.org/ 32 32 SACRED EARTH by the Ragamala Dance Company will be presented as part of the BRIC https://balibs.org/sacred-earth-by-the-ragamala-dance-company-will-be-presented-as-part-of-the-bric/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 18:10:29 +0000 https://balibs.org/sacred-earth-by-the-ragamala-dance-company-will-be-presented-as-part-of-the-bric/ Celebrate Brooklyn! At the Lena Horne Bandshell, 9th Street & Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, NY. Sacred Earth is an enchanting work for seven dancers and five musicians that explodes with colors, rhythms and ecstatic movements. To RSVP for the FREE event, CLICK HERE. Rooted in the expansive South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam, Ragamala Dance […]]]>

Celebrate Brooklyn! At the Lena Horne Bandshell, 9th Street & Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, NY. Sacred Earth is an enchanting work for seven dancers and five musicians that explodes with colors, rhythms and ecstatic movements. To RSVP for the FREE event, CLICK HERE.

Rooted in the expansive South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam, Ragamala Dance Company manifests a kinship relationship between the ancient and the contemporary. Sacred Earth explores the interconnectedness of our physical environments and our inner states of being. Performed with a stellar musical ensemble from India, dancers create a sacred space to honor divinity in the natural world and the sustenance we derive from it. Inspired by the philosophies behind the ephemeral arts of kolam and Warli painting, and the Tamil Sangam literature of India, Sacred Earth is Ranee and Aparna Ramaswamy’s singular vision of the beautiful and fragile relationship between nature and man. . RSVPs are encouraged by not required. Admission is first-come, first-served, and RSVPs help keep you up to date on show information.

About Ragamala Dance Company

Ragamala Dance Company is the vision of award-winning mother/daughter artists Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy. Over the past four decades, Ranee and Aparna’s practice in the South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam has altered the trajectory of culturally rooted performing arts in the United States to create an exemplary company in the American dance landscape. . Through intimate solos and large-scale theatrical works for the stage, Ranee and Aparna enhance the South Asian American experience. By engaging the dynamic tension between ancestral wisdom and creative freedom, they reveal the kindred relationship between ancient and contemporary that today’s world urgently needs.

With Aparna Ramaswamy as the principal dancer, Ragamala has been commissioned and performed across the United States, India and abroad, highlighted by the Kennedy Center (Washington, DC), Joyce Theater (New York) , Lincoln Center (New York), Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival (MA), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), American Dance Festival (Durham, North Carolina), The Soraya (Southern California), Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, International Festival of Arts & Ideas (New Haven, CT), Cal Performances (Berkeley), Arts Center at NYU Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates), Just Festival (Edinburgh, United Kingdom), Bali Arts Festival (Indonesia), Sri Krishna Gana Sabha (Chennai, India) and National Center for Performing Arts (Mumbai, India), among others. ragamaladance.org.

ABOUT THE BRIC

BRIC is a leading arts and media institution rooted in downtown Brooklyn whose work spans contemporary visual and performing arts, media, and civic action. For over forty years, BRIC has shaped Brooklyn’s cultural and media landscape by showcasing and incubating artists, creators, students and media makers. As a creative catalyst for their community, BRIC stimulates learning in people of all ages and centralizes diverse voices that take risks and move the culture forward. BRIC is building Brooklyn’s creative future.

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BALAM Dance Theater will make its Balinese bumblebee dance debut at the NICE festival https://balibs.org/balam-dance-theater-will-make-its-balinese-bumblebee-dance-debut-at-the-nice-festival/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:02:21 +0000 https://balibs.org/balam-dance-theater-will-make-its-balinese-bumblebee-dance-debut-at-the-nice-festival/ Discover the haunting beauty of Bali during the BALAM Dance Theater (BALAM) debut at the Norwalk International Cultural Exchange Festival (NICE). BALAM, non-profit professional dance company, presents the enchanting program, Oleg Tambulilingan (Love Dance of the Bumblebees), live on Saturday, July 9, 2022 at 2:45 p.m. The program takes place rain or shine at 10 […]]]>

Discover the haunting beauty of Bali during the BALAM Dance Theater (BALAM) debut at the Norwalk International Cultural Exchange Festival (NICE). BALAM, non-profit professional dance company, presents the enchanting program, Oleg Tambulilingan (Love Dance of the Bumblebees), live on Saturday, July 9, 2022 at 2:45 p.m.

The program takes place rain or shine at 10 North Water Street in Norwalk, Connecticut.

The family NICE Festival is open to the public and admission is free. For more information, visit https://norwalknice.org/ .

BALAM offers a vision of contemporary cultural dance that is aimed at audiences of all ages and from all walks of life. The New York-based company combines Balinese theater with ballet, modern and diverse cultural dance styles from around the world and historical periods. This latest program in BALAM’s Out & About series features the company’s artistic director, Carlos Fittante, and resident Balinese artist, Nani Devi, dancing to uplifting Keybar gamelan gong music. The exquisitely costumed duo fan themselves and fidget like two bumblebees courting each other.

Fittante has extensively studied and practiced Balinese dance and fusion dance in Bali. A specialist in Balinese, Baroque and Spanish escuela bolera dances, his performances and choreography have received praise from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Village Voice and Dance Magazine. He has worked with the Metropolitan Opera, New York Theater Ballet, Apollo’s Fire, Gotham Early Music Scene, Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors, Downtown Dance Festival, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, 2nd Encuentro de Baile Contemporáneo in Mexico and the International Arts Festival in Bali. A graduate of the School of American Ballet, he holds an MFA in dance from the University of Wisconsin and is a renowned visiting teacher. Currently, he is on the faculty of the Dance Department at Queens College-City University in New York, as an Adjunct Assistant Professor, where he teaches Introduction to Dance and Ballet.

Devi, a famous performer from Bali, has toured and taught all over the world. She specializes in and performs classical Balinese dance, as well as those from the Indonesian islands of Sumatra, Java, Borneo and Sulawesi. Born in Bali, Indonesia, Devi started dancing at the age of ten in the village of Tabanan. Noted for dancing with natural grace and gentle expression, she was selected by the Indonesian government to perform in palaces in Bali to visit heads of state promoting Indonesian dance forms for the Ministry of Culture.

The Norwalk International Cultural Exchange (NICE) is a 501(c3) non-profit organization whose goal is to promote and increase awareness of the diversity of people around the world through arts and culture. NICE’s mission is to encourage the various groups that make up our society to learn about each other’s traditions and customs in order to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of what each group brings to our community.

For more information about the BALAM Dance Theater festival and programming, contact 646-361-9183 or balamdancetheatre@gmail.com.

Founded by choreographer and movement researcher Islene Pinder, BALAM Dance Theater offers a new vision of contemporary dance rooted in the dazzling opulence and magical aura of Balinese theatre.

The New York-based dance/theatre company creates a unique entertainment experience that has universal appeal. Audiences of all ages and backgrounds enjoy BALAM’s innovative movement alchemy, where dynamic athleticism, detailed skills and movement techniques from around the world and eras are fused and enhanced by eclectic music, masks striking, vibrant costumes and fantastic stories.

The company educates the community about the dances and cultures present in its repertoire. Through its Out & About series, free and affordable local creative shows, workshops and events are made available to families, children, students and community residents.

BALAM has been featured in numerous festivals and venues including First Night New York; Lincoln Center exterior; Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival; Downtown Dance Festival; and has also appeared in the United States and around the world. The company has received praise from the New York Times and Village Voice, the Governor and Residents of Bali and the Indonesian Consulate in New York, and others.

For more information, call 646-361-9183 or visit BALAM Dance Theater on their website, http://www.balamdancetheatre.com.

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Ragamala Dance Company selected for National Arts Initiative funded by Wallace Foundation https://balibs.org/ragamala-dance-company-selected-for-national-arts-initiative-funded-by-wallace-foundation/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 23:07:17 +0000 https://balibs.org/ragamala-dance-company-selected-for-national-arts-initiative-funded-by-wallace-foundation/ Ragamala Dance Company has been selected to participate in the first phase of the Wallace Foundation’s new five-year arts initiative focused on arts organizations of color, created as part of the foundation’s efforts to foster equitable improvements in the arts. Following an open call in 2021 that attracted over 250 applicants, Ragamala Dance Company was […]]]>

Ragamala Dance Company has been selected to participate in the first phase of the Wallace Foundation’s new five-year arts initiative focused on arts organizations of color, created as part of the foundation’s efforts to foster equitable improvements in the arts. Following an open call in 2021 that attracted over 250 applicants, Ragamala Dance Company was selected as one of 18 non-profit organizations representing a wide range of artistic disciplines, geographic locations and communities served. . Alongside the other selected organizations, Ragamala Dance Company will receive five years of funding to develop and pursue a project responding to a strategic challenge. Researchers will document the work of each organization with the aim of developing useful insights into the relationship between community orientation, resilience and relevance.

“It is an honor to be selected for this inspiring new initiative and to be part of so many other organizations doing vital work in the arts community,” said Aparna Ramaswamy, Ragamala Dance Company. “We look forward to building a strong partnership with the Wallace Foundation and embarking on these next five years of innovation and development. During this time, we will continue our commitment to cultivating the next generation of artistic thinkers and leaders. South Asia, evolving systems to include them at every stage of the artistic process: from curators and funders to choreographers and designers.Through this process, we will thoroughly document our artistic, organizational and research-based advocacy work to serve as a case study for future generations.

Originally announced in July 2021 as a $53 million endeavor involving a dozen organizations, Wallace has expanded the initiative to include additional grantees and planned funding of up to $100 million over five years. While Wallace’s support does not eliminate the need for other funding that supports the Ragamala Dance Company and other grantee organizations, it helps provide the time and resources needed to explore new approaches to pressing challenges, including: succession planning; developing equity-focused practices; develop values-aligned business models; increase visibility; and create cultural spaces that nurture the creativity and well-being of artists and the communities served.

First, Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy of the Ragamala Dance Company will embark alongside the other grantees on a year of planning their individual projects in partnership with Wallace, researchers, consultants and financial management advisors. While the specifics of each organization’s projects are unique, there are commonalities and opportunities for shared learning and support. Grantees will work with Wallace to name the initiative and identify any technical supports they may need before beginning four years of project implementation.

The Community Orientation Action Research Team (COART), made up of researchers from Arizona State University and the University of Virginia, was funded to co-develop the initiative’s research design with beneficiaries. The research should explore the initiative’s guiding question through the lens of the projects that grantees will implement over four years. Additionally, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) oversees a fellowship program for 18 qualitative early-career researchers, one of whom will be paired with Ragamala Dance Company to develop ethnography that documents the history, practices, and culture organisation.

Full list of participating organizations:

  • 1Hood Media (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

  • National Arab American Museum (Dearborn, Michigan)

  • BlackStar (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

  • Chicago Sinfonietta (Chicago, Illinois)

  • EastSide Arts Alliance, Black Cultural Zone and Artist As First Responder (Oakland, CA)

  • Esperanza Center for Peace and Justice (San Antonio, Texas)

  • Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, North Carolina)

  • Contemporary Art Museum of Puerto Rico (San Juan, Puerto Rico)

  • PHILADANCO! The Philadelphia Dance Company (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

  • Pillsbury House + Theater (Minneapolis, Minnesota)

  • Pregones / Puerto Rican Traveling Theater (Manhattan and Bronx, NY)

  • Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project (San Francisco, CA)

  • Ragamala Dance Company (Minneapolis, Minnesota)

  • Rebuild Foundation (Chicago, Ill.)

  • Self Help Graphics & Art (Los Angeles, CA)

  • Mu Theater (St. Paul, Minnesota)

  • The Laundromat Project (Brooklyn, NY)

  • The Union for Contemporary Art (Omaha, Neb.)

The initiative is based on research dating back to the 1970s suggesting that community orientation, along with high-quality arts programming, can be fundamental to organizational health. Community orientation has been described, in the literature, as the preservation or presentation of the art forms of a particular racial, ethnic or tribal group, support for artists from the target community, development of the workforce cultural work of this community and the defense of the community within a wider social society. -political contexts, among other activities. In addition to gaining a better understanding of what community orientation looks like in different organizations, Wallace hopes to learn with organizations how they define relevance and resilience. For more information, please visit https://www.wallacefoundation.org/news-and-media/press-releases/pages/eighteen-arts-organizations-communities-of-color-selected-for-national-arts-initiative-the-wallace-foundation. aspx.

About the beneficiary selection process

To select the first group of grantees, Wallace reviewed applications submitted by organizations in the visual and performing arts, media arts, and community organizations focused on artistic practice with budgets between $500,000 and $5 million. dollars. The foundation sought to create a group of funded organizations serving diverse communities, focusing on projects that leverage community orientation and address different types of strategic challenges.

ABOUT RAGAMALA DANCE COMPANY

Ragamala Dance Company is the vision of award-winning mother/daughter artists Ranee Ramaswamy and Aparna Ramaswamy. Over the past four decades, Ranee and Aparna’s practice in the South Indian dance form of Bharatanatyam has altered the trajectory of culturally rooted performing arts in the United States to create an exemplary company in the American dance landscape. . Through intimate solos and large-scale theatrical works for the stage, Ranee and Aparna enhance the South Asian American experience. By engaging the dynamic tension between ancestral wisdom and creative freedom, they reveal the kindred relationship between ancient and contemporary that today’s world urgently needs.

With Aparna Ramaswamy as the principal dancer, Ragamala has been commissioned and performed across the United States, India and abroad, highlighted by the Kennedy Center (Washington, DC), Joyce Theater (New York) , Lincoln Center (New York), Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival (MA), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), American Dance Festival (Durham, North Carolina), The Soraya (Southern California), Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, International Festival of Arts & Ideas (New Haven, CT), Cal Performances (Berkeley), Arts Center at NYU Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates), Just Festival (Edinburgh, United Kingdom), Bali Arts Festival (Indonesia), Sri Krishna Gana Sabha (Chennai, India) and National Center for Performing Arts (Mumbai, India), among others. ragamaladance.org.

ABOUT THE WALLACE FOUNDATION

The mission of the Wallace Foundation is to foster equity and improved learning and enrichment for young people, and the arts for all. Wallace works nationally, with a focus on the arts, K-12 educational leadership, and youth development. In all of his work, Wallace seeks to benefit both his direct beneficiaries as well as the areas in which he works by developing and widely sharing relevant and useful knowledge that can improve practice and policy. For more information, please visit the Foundation’s Knowledge Center at wallacefoundation.org.

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Celebrate Market Day and the iconic Day Dance Festival at Paxton Wines • Glam Adelaide https://balibs.org/celebrate-market-day-and-the-iconic-day-dance-festival-at-paxton-wines-glam-adelaide/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 03:03:47 +0000 https://balibs.org/celebrate-market-day-and-the-iconic-day-dance-festival-at-paxton-wines-glam-adelaide/ To share Tweeter To share To share E-mail Make the most of the June long weekend on the Fleurieu Peninsula with a market day of superb wines from Paxton, McLaren Vale. Paxton Wines is giving us back-to-back events with their Market Day on June 11 and Day Dance the next day. Paxton Wines has kept […]]]>

Make the most of the June long weekend on the Fleurieu Peninsula with a market day of superb wines from Paxton, McLaren Vale.

Paxton Wines is giving us back-to-back events with their Market Day on June 11 and Day Dance the next day.

Paxton Wines has kept us all busy with their fall event lineup. They have already kicked off the season with their now famous Sunday Sessions, full of live music, pizzas and organic/biodynamic wines.

But the Paxton Wines team has something special for us this June long weekend. To celebrate Day Dance, Paxton Wines will host a Market Day.

Paxton Wines Market Day will celebrate the magic from 10am to 4pm with live music throughout, cellar door and beer garden, hot food and of course, market stalls. Enjoy a glass of organic/biodynamic wines from Paxton while you shop. Soul Trader and Ben Smith will provide amazing live entertainment throughout the day.

Some of the traders who will be in the market will understand; Aroma Joy, Bring Bali Home, Kites2KITES, Big G’s Jerky, Breathless Jewelery and more!

The highly anticipated Day Dance festival will also be back this month, promising the same amazing experience as in previous years. Paxton Wines will be one of the hosts of the Day Dance series of events this year. The stage will be filled with fabulous acts that include Joe Mungovan, Ryan Martin John and Trent Worley.

For the first time ever, Day Dance will have two neighboring wineries on the same tour. Paxton Wines and Simon Hackett Winery. This means that it is not necessary to travel by bus in the middle of the day because it is only 350 meters on foot!

Your ticket includes round-trip bus transport, admission and entertainment, plus a Day Dance glass of wine.

Your June long weekend at Paxton Wines will be filled with great music, great food and an even better atmosphere. Paxton Wines Market Day will be June 11 and the Dance of the Day will take place the following day, June 12.

Get your tickets for the dance of the day hereand head to Paxton Wines for its market day this long weekend in June.




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Retracing the close link between Indian dance and Southeast Asia https://balibs.org/retracing-the-close-link-between-indian-dance-and-southeast-asia/ Thu, 26 May 2022 12:15:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/retracing-the-close-link-between-indian-dance-and-southeast-asia/ Somewhere off the coast of Cambodia, an old ship from Mamallapuram docks on a beautiful beach after several weeks of travel. The vassals of Mahendravarman I disembark, taking with them Tamil and Sanskrit writing, the spices of southern India and the scent of the arts that originate along the banks of the Cauvery. While many […]]]>

Somewhere off the coast of Cambodia, an old ship from Mamallapuram docks on a beautiful beach after several weeks of travel. The vassals of Mahendravarman I disembark, taking with them Tamil and Sanskrit writing, the spices of southern India and the scent of the arts that originate along the banks of the Cauvery. While many vassals and rulers had come and gone before them, their arrival in Southeast Asia marked a turning point in the history of art and culture.

The influence of Hinduism and Indian culture in Southeast Asia is generally understood as a function of conquest and trade. However, the history of Indian dance is a little more complex. Could the moves have been swapped? Can the repertoire be acquired? As is often the case with embodied forms, the evolution of their practice relies on the individual bodies of the practitioners. This was the case for the Indian vassals who arrived in Java, Sumatra, Bali, Siam Annam Borneo and Cambodia.

The first links between Indian dance and Southeast Asia were identified by Padma Subrahmanyam and Kapila Vatsyayan. Both prolific scholars observed that the sculptural arts of Southeast Asia reflected a deep understanding of the codes within the Natyashastra. This is particularly reflected in the 9th century temple complex of Prambanan in Indonesia, where there are 62 dancing sculptures, labeled according to the postures delineated in the fourth chapter of the Natyashastra, titled “Tandava Laksanam”. This dance catalog is somewhat the oldest of its kind, predating the visual dance catalogs found in Thanjavur, Chidambaram, Kumbakonam and other sites in Tamil Nadu. Interestingly, the idea of ​​visually documenting the sequence of dance postures in stone, as they appear in the text, may have originated in Southeast Asia.

Angkor Wat temple in Cambodia

Angkor Wat temple in Cambodia | Photo credit: AFP

As part of a deeper exploration of this idea, Alessandra Lopez y Royo has spent several decades engaging with the dance archeology of this site, with the aim of recording the karana sculptures and embodying them. In practice. Edi Sedyawati, a Javanese scholar, explored the links between India and Indonesia and their impact on the Balinese and Javanese dance repertoire. Many other researchers have studied this relationship in other parts of Southeast Asia, including Thailand, Cambodia, and Myanmar.

The common bond

This search, though varied in its manifestations, converges on a single and powerful achievement – ​​the Natyashastra was a text that found resonance in South and Southeast Asian art forms. It is this commonality, explains Aravinth Kumarasamy, artistic director of the Singapore-based Apsaras Arts Dance Company, that allows the forms of the two cultures to collaborate fruitfully. A pioneer in pursuing the embodied conversation between Bharatanatyam and Southeast Asia, Aravinth has worked with Javanese, Balinese and Cambodian dancers across his impressive production profile. He says Padma Subrahmanyam has been a mentor and one of the driving forces behind exploring these commonalities.

“It’s easy to bring these art forms together organically. Although the manifestations of the Natyashastra may be totally different, there is a body of shared knowledge that allows us to engage in the same context. Kumarasamy narrates an example from his production “Anjaneyam”, where the character of Sita had to perform a sanchari. “It is difficult to explain the concept of sanchari to Javanese dancers, especially with a language barrier. But after watching it once in rehearsal, they instinctively understood what we were doing and created a counterpoint in the Javanese style.

Over the years, Aravinth’s works such as “Amara” (dancing stories of Banteay Srei), “Angkor” (inspired by the magnificent bas-reliefs on the walls of Angkor Wat) and “Anjasa” (on the architecture Buddhist temples) celebrated the history and culture of India and Southeast Asia. “With each production, I grew more enthusiastic about unraveling that strong bond.”

Mohanapriyan Thavarajah's latest book

Mohanapriyan Thavarajah’s Latest Book | Photo credit: Apsaras Arts Dance Company

The temple complexes of Angkor Wat have beautiful intricate panels depicting scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharatha. Apsaras Arts Dance Company Principal Dancer Mohanapriyan Thavarajah’s Latest Book Apsaras temple dance: view of a dancer on Angkor Wat, is an extension of his research on the famous temple complex and explores the angika abhinaya of the Cambodian tradition. Mohanapriyan notes that the evolution of the form resonates with that of Bharatanatyam, with similar changes in patronage, from temples to courts, and a comparable prominence of Devadasi dancers. “There are only five mudras popularly used in Cambodian dance,” he explains, adding that “some characters wear masks.” This is one of the many distinctions he has discovered in his practice and interaction with Southeast Asian forms.

Aravinth expands on these observations by noting that Southeast Asian dance forms are much more collaborative than those of India. “At Bharatanatyam, we are all trained to be solo artists, while Southeast Asian dance tradition and training prepares them for ensemble work. Each dancer has a specific role to play.

Asked about the reception by the public of these collaborative productions, Aravinth is particularly passionate. “As traditional Indian artists, we are obsessed with the diaspora. It’s always about [performing at] Carnegie Hall. We already have a discerning audience of rasikas in Southeast Asia who truly understand the nuances of our work. More dancers need to recognize this and perform widely in these regions.

The Bengaluru-based writer is a dancer and researcher.

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So You Think You Can Dance season 17 episode 1 soundtrack https://balibs.org/so-you-think-you-can-dance-season-17-episode-1-soundtrack/ Wed, 18 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/so-you-think-you-can-dance-season-17-episode-1-soundtrack/ SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE: LR: Judges Stephen “tWitch” Boss, JoJo Siwa and Matthew Morrison at the Los Angeles auditions for SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE airing Wednesday, May 18 (9-10 p.m. ET/PT) on FOX. ©2022 Fox Media LLC. CR: Mike Yarish/FOX Survivor 42 episode 11 sees Maryanne steal the show by Travis […]]]>

on Fox.

The dance competition was missed by fans and dancers. Due to the pandemic, we were deprived of the series for a few years, but now that it’s back, we can once again fall in love with this inspiring and uplifting contest. However, we will miss Nigel Lythgoe, Mary Murphy and Laurieann Gibson who were originally chosen to judge before the show closed.

New judges – Stephen “tWitch” Boss, JoJo Siwa and Matthew Morrison – and host Cat Deely welcomed this year’s hopefuls to LA auditions where the contest kicked off with more than a few classic and hit songs during the auditions and the candidates. backgrounds.

Did you catch a song or two that you’d like to listen to again but weren’t sure of the artist or title? No worries, we’ve compiled a list of the music featured in the first episode of So you think you can dance season 17. Check it out below!

So You Think You Can Dance season 17 episode 1 soundtrack

  • What a Wonderful World – Reuben and The Dark & ​​AG (Konnor audition)
  • Odg – Eltee Skhillz (Samuel audition)
  • Waka Waka (Esto Es Africa) – Shakira ft. freshlyground
  • Miracle – Galantis and Bali Bandits
  • Tko – The Tigray
  • 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover – Paul Simon (Anna Audition)
  • I am a woman – Emmy Meli
  • Dior – Pop Smoke (Anastasiia audition)
  • Shake Your Pants – Cameo (Anastasiia and tWitch Dance Battle)
  • Seven Nation Army – The White Stripes (Dakota and Misha audition)
  • Solitaire – Noah Cyrus
  • One Way (Bonus – 6LACK ft. T-Pain (Maci audition)

New episodes of So you think you can dance season 17 airs Wednesdays at 9 p.m. ET on Fox. The following day, streaming of the show will be available on Hulu.

Stay tuned to Hidden Remote for more So you think you can dance Season 17 news and coverage!

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Student’s school changed to avoid dance and music lessons https://balibs.org/students-school-changed-to-avoid-dance-and-music-lessons/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/students-school-changed-to-avoid-dance-and-music-lessons/ HYDERABAD: The parent of a Class IV student at a private school wanted his daughter to be exempted from dance and music activities at school on religious grounds. However, the school did not consider her request, saying it would harm the child and also cause logistical problems. Thus, the parent preferred to admit his child […]]]>

HYDERABAD: The parent of a Class IV student at a private school wanted his daughter to be exempted from dance and music activities at school on religious grounds. However, the school did not consider her request, saying it would harm the child and also cause logistical problems. Thus, the parent preferred to admit his child to another school.

The parent, Ehsaan Raza, said he had asked the authorities at St Michael’s School not to let his eight-year-old daughter participate in dance or music activities, which would be part of the extracurricular activities carried out at the school. .

However, Mohan Simham, CEO of the school, told the father of the pupil that his request could not be granted because firstly, the child would miss some activities, which fell under the inclusive learning practiced by the school.

“I can’t have a child sitting while the rest of the group is doing an activity. In the eyes of the child, there is obviously a certain level of deprivation. We also don’t believe in leaving a child behind, all children should move forward at a certain pace. Second, who will take care of the child during the lessons? It becomes a challenge,” Simham said. After their discussion, Raza preferred to admit her child to another school.

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The flamenco dance show provides a feast for the people of Islo https://balibs.org/the-flamenco-dance-show-provides-a-feast-for-the-people-of-islo/ Thu, 12 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://balibs.org/the-flamenco-dance-show-provides-a-feast-for-the-people-of-islo/ The artists will also perform in Faisalabad, Lahore and Karachi. Ambassador Duran deserves kudos for introducing this kind of music to Pakistan Staff report/DNA ISLAMABAD: The Embassy of Spain in collaboration with the Islamabad Club organized a Flamenco dance show in the beautiful laws of the Islamabad Cricket Club, adjacent to the Pakistan Sports Complex. […]]]>

The artists will also perform in Faisalabad, Lahore and Karachi. Ambassador Duran deserves kudos for introducing this kind of music to Pakistan

Staff report/DNA

ISLAMABAD: The Embassy of Spain in collaboration with the Islamabad Club organized a Flamenco dance show in the beautiful laws of the Islamabad Cricket Club, adjacent to the Pakistan Sports Complex. The venue was recently inaugurated through the efforts of Cabinet Secretary and Islamabad Club Administrator Ahmed Nawaz Sukhera, who happens to be an avid cricketer himself and a cricketer himself.

The flamenco dance (baile) is a very expressive Spanish dance form. Flamenco is a solo dance characterized by hand clapping, percussive footwork, and intricate hand, arm, and body movements. The dance is usually accompanied by a singer and a guitarist.

The Spanish Ambassador, Manuel Duran, in his brief remarks, introduced the Spanish artists to the audience in addition to giving a brief description of what the artists were going to present. The audience couldn’t help but applaud the artists after witnessing their spellbinding performance.

The artists will also perform in Faisalabad, Lahore and Karachi. Ambassador Duran deserves kudos for introducing this kind of music to Pakistan. During his tenure, he facilitated a number of these performances. The last performance organized in collaboration with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs aroused great interest.

The Ambassador said that last year we celebrated a very special anniversary: ​​70 years ago, diplomatic relations between Spain and Pakistan began with the establishment in 1951 of our first embassy in Karachi, which was later transferred to Islamabad.

Since then, I and all my predecessors have worked with one goal in mind: to strengthen the ties between our countries and our peoples, to increase contacts and to encourage Pakistani citizens to discover all that Spain represents: an open and friendly country. , with a long and rich history that connects us to the rest of the world. As you know, Spanish culture is immense and diverse, the result of centuries of evolution and contact with other peoples.

“And today I would like to focus precisely on culture: the Spanish Embassy has brought a flamenco music group directly from Seville, Andalusia, to Islamabad.. Today will be the starting point of a tour that will take them to other cities.

While talking about dance, he said, flamenco, although it needs no introduction: flamenco is one of the most valuable manifestations of Spain’s intangible cultural heritage, classified by UNESCO. It’s a mixture of dancing, singing and applause. And the roots of flamenco, although somewhat mysterious, seem to lie in the migration of Roma from this subcontinent to Spain between the 9th and 14th centuries. These migrants brought with them musical instruments, such as tambourines, bells and wooden castanets, as well as a vast repertoire of songs and dances. Once in Spain, these traditions merged with the art of the gypsies living in the southwest of Spain and flamenco was born.

As you can see, even though 6,500 kilometers separate our two countries, culture brings us together and shows us how close we can be. Hope you enjoy today’s cultural show.

“I would like to give a small token of gratitude and respect to the honorable administrator, Mr. Ahmad Nawaz Sukhera, and the respected secretary, Mr. Sheharyar Mirza.”

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CLYMOVE Dance to Present Inaugural Spring Season at Alpha Omega Theatrical Dance Theater https://balibs.org/clymove-dance-to-present-inaugural-spring-season-at-alpha-omega-theatrical-dance-theater/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 19:51:48 +0000 https://balibs.org/clymove-dance-to-present-inaugural-spring-season-at-alpha-omega-theatrical-dance-theater/ CLYMOVE Dance will present an inaugural spring season choreographed by Clymene Aldinger, former principal dancer with Elisa Monte Dance (2009-2017) and last protege of Monte, May 20 and 21, 2022, 7:30 p.m., at the Alpha Omega Theatrical Dance Theater. This will be the company’s debut in Manhattan! CLYMOVE is a message-driven dance company committed to […]]]>

CLYMOVE Dance will present an inaugural spring season choreographed by Clymene Aldinger, former principal dancer with Elisa Monte Dance (2009-2017) and last protege of Monte, May 20 and 21, 2022, 7:30 p.m., at the Alpha Omega Theatrical Dance Theater. This will be the company’s debut in Manhattan! CLYMOVE is a message-driven dance company committed to virtuoso dance focused on authentic exploration. There will be cocktails and conversations after the performance on both nights.

MAYDAY // MAY DAY is a performance that incorporates dances from Femmenisto Chapter One by Clymene Aldinger, a one-night work that premiered in December 2021, and past and present dances choreographed by Aldinger, which explore the philosophy and spirituality. The choreography will traverse the dark, the weird and the painful, as well as the silly, the eccentric and the fun. The dancers will oscillate on stage between shared moments and solitude. The dancers demonstrate endurance and athleticism, using the tempo, strength and insight of partners while exploiting the art of pausing and returning to slow motion. The dancers take turns supporting each other physically and connecting emotionally, through darker and lighter interactions, often finding themselves in an existential crisis. Ultimately, they try to find a balance in the movement that feels authentic to who they are as individuals full of beautiful shadows and scary potential.

CLYMOVE FOUNDER, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CHOREOGRAPHER

Clymene Aldinger, MA, LMHC (NY, NY) a native of Jacksonville, Florida, earned a BFA in Dance and Honorary Award for Distinction in Choreography from Ailey School/Fordham University in 2002. While at Ailey School, under the direction of Dennis Jefferson and Ana-Marie Forsythe, she has performed for many acclaimed choreographers and apprenticed with Sean Curran Company. Clymene then spent several years as a dance teacher, teacher and choreographer for Douglas Anderson School of the Arts in Jacksonville, Florida, and remains on the faculty as a visiting artist. Clymene earned a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Rollins College in 2006 and worked as a student counseling specialist at the University of Central Florida Counseling Center until returning to New York in 2009. She is currently a counselor mental health practitioner licensed in New York State in private practice: Artist Within, psychotherapy for artists and creative professionals since 2009. Clymene has performed with Elisa Monte Dancing for eight years. Elisa Monte Dance was a critically acclaimed New York dance company that toured nationally and internationally for forty years. Clymene joined the company as a principal dancer and performed as a principal dancer for seven years until her retirement in June 2017. Clymene acknowledges Elisa Monte as a lifelong mentor, and assists him in teaching and creating choreography all over the world. During her time with the company, she performed 20 of Elisa Montethe choreographic works of. Clymene teaches and performs in Bali, Thailand, China, Florida and New York. She is the Founder and Artistic Director of CLYMOVE Dance, Inc. established in Brooklyn, NY in 2021. She also holds a Masters in Performance Studies from NYU. Finally, in addition to birthing a new dream, forming her own dance company, and exploring her choreographic vision, Clymene gave birth to a beautiful baby named Priscilla, and now number two, Poe, has just arrived. ‘arrive.

MISSION, DANCE COMPANY/DANCERS, LEADERSHIP, BIOS AND FUNDING INFORMATION https://www.clymove.org

Performance details:

CLYMOVE Dance, Inc. presents

MAYDAY // MAY DAY

May 20 and 21, at 7.30 p.m.

Alpha Omega Theatrical Dance Theater

70 E. 4th Street

New York | NY | 10003

TICKET HERE!

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]]> Sisterhood: Video Of Trans Women Performing A Dance For Their Late Friend At Balinese Funeral Ritual Goes Viral (And We’re Here For It) https://balibs.org/sisterhood-video-of-trans-women-performing-a-dance-for-their-late-friend-at-balinese-funeral-ritual-goes-viral-and-were-here-for-it/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 08:03:06 +0000 https://balibs.org/sisterhood-video-of-trans-women-performing-a-dance-for-their-late-friend-at-balinese-funeral-ritual-goes-viral-and-were-here-for-it/ Tika Inces Widuri, a Balinese trans woman based in Seririt, Buleleng, died last week aged 27 after being hospitalized for five days due to gastrointestinal infections. Before she died, Tika expressed her wish that her friends could perform the sacred dance segment of her ngaben (Balinese funeral ceremony). Her friends happily agreed and the video […]]]>

Tika Inces Widuri, a Balinese trans woman based in Seririt, Buleleng, died last week aged 27 after being hospitalized for five days due to gastrointestinal infections. Before she died, Tika expressed her wish that her friends could perform the sacred dance segment of her ngaben (Balinese funeral ceremony).

Her friends happily agreed and the video recently went viral after being uploaded to TikTok. The caption, written in Balinese, means: “Become one with Almighty God. Have a nice trip my friend. I hope you are in a better place in the afterlife.”

Considering how indonesia has become homophobic and transphobic in recent years (remember when netizens in indonesia attacked this lovely gay couple from thailand?) the 19-second video represents a beacon of hope for those who want more tolerance for society’s attitude towards minorities of gender.

Tika was part of the Singaraja Gay and Trans Women (abbreviated locally as Wargas) community, which helps its members to express themselves through artistic expression, including dance.

Wargas’ de facto chief Sisca D. Panggabean, affectionately called Mami Sisca (think Blanca Evangelista of Laid), said the group was initially hesitant about whether locals would agree to such a request.

“For Tika, dancing was her passion. Before her death, she asked her friends [including fellow trans women] to perform the dance as her body is transported from the funeral home to its final resting place,” Mami Sisca said. Coconutadding that although she is aware of the many forms of discrimination LGBTQIA+ Indonesians (especially trans women) regularly face, it was crucial to honor Tika’s dying wish.

“I visited local leaders and community members. I told them that’s what she wanted but we want to make sure we get the green light. What if we were already wearing makeup and putting on dresses only to encounter negative reactions? added the 49-year-old trans woman.

Fortunately, the locals agreed to Tika’s latest request and encouraged Sisca and his colleagues to carry out the plan. The ngaben The ceremony took place on Monday and the video of the dance has since gone viral.

Sisca explained that the dance that trans women performed was called to run and it was more a form of entertainment than a solemn ritual. However, she said it helped bring joy to Tika’s family, who were mourning her passing.

“We didn’t expect the video to go viral. Really, we just wanted to honor his last wish,” said Mami Sisca.

Trans women in Indonesia are the most vulnerable group among the country’s LGBTQIA+ community. Many of them are unable to complete their education after being rejected as children and therefore have few employment opportunities as adults. Many trans women end up working as street vendors or prostitutes.

Tika, according to Sisca, was a trans woman who was able to bring home the bacon for her family as a professional dancer. However, when COVID-19 hit in 2020, Tika, like many trans women, struggled to get food on his family’s table.

“Tika was a hard worker and was the breadwinner. As a dancer, she may have felt the need to diet intensively to maintain her figure and performance to the point of having a gastric infection. She was sick last year and due to the COVID-19 pandemic she didn’t get many jobs. [I guess] that’s what triggered his illness,” said Mami Sisca.

another wish

When Tika’s body was bathed for the last time in a local ritual known as nyiramangMami Sisca revealed that they suggested that family members allow makeup artists to work their magic on Tika’s face.

“We convinced them that’s what she would want,” said Mami Sisca.

Family members agreed, but insisted that Tika appear as a man for the remainder of the funeral and be buried as such. Mami Sisca said she reluctantly agreed and used the experience to tell other young trans women under her wing to live their best life as women and not worry too much about what happens after the death. dead.

“We have to be realistic,” she said.

Dorce Gamalama, a trans icon who recently died due to complications from COVID-19 and diabetes, reportedly asked to be buried as a woman. However, her family buried her as a man anyway due to social pressure.

This represented a sad setback for trans rights in Indonesia, given that Dorce was a pioneer in trans visibility in the country. Plus, not only had she had sex reassignment surgery decades ago, a court also had approved her legal status as a woman.

There’s still a long way to go, but the 19-second clip of Tika granting her wish is definitely something many LGBTQIA+ Indonesians want to see.

“I really appreciate him because his family was ready to honor [Tika’s] Last request. Especially since they allowed trans friends to accompany his departure [from this life] with dance,” said Arya, program manager of Denpasar-based NGO that focuses on HIV/AIDS education, prevention and support, Yayasan Gaya Dewata.

Dede Oetomo, founder of GAYa NUSANTARA, Indonesia’s oldest LGBT advocacy group, praised the video.

“[The video] showed the old culture which is more tolerant and accepts differences,” he said. Coconut.

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